California to ban pesticide said to harm child development

California to ban pesticide said to harm child development
In this July 21, 2015, file photo, a nearly ready-to-harvest almond is seen in an orchard in Newman, Calif. On Thursday, May 9, 2019, California regulators are recommending new restrictions on a widely used pesticide blamed for harming babies' brains. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, File)

The nation's most productive agricultural state will ban a widely used pesticide blamed for harming brain development in babies, California officials said Wednesday.

The move cheered by environmental groups would outlaw chlorpyrifos (klohr-PY'-rih-fohs) after scientists deemed it a toxic air contaminant and discovered it to be more dangerous than previously thought. State Environmental Secretary Jared Blumenfeld said it's the first time the state has sought to ban a pesticide and the move was overdue.

"This pesticide is a neurotoxin and it was first put on the market in 1965," Blumenfeld said. "So it's been on the shelf a long time and it's past its sell-by date."

The decision comes after regulators in several states have taken steps in recent years to restrict the pesticide currently used on about 60 different crops in California, including grapes, almonds and oranges.

Hawaii banned it last year and New York lawmakers recently sent a bill to the governor outlawing use of the pesticide.

DowDuPont, which produces the pesticide, said it was disappointed with the decision and that it would hurt farmers who rely on it to control insects.

Blumenfeld said the state took action in part because the federal government allowed the pesticide to be used after the Obama Administration tried to phase it out.

California to ban pesticide said to harm child development
In this Aug. 28, 2013, file photo, a load of Sauvignon Blanc grapes are dropped into a bin during harvest in St. Helena, Calif. California regulators are recommending new restrictions on a widely used pesticide blamed for harming babies' brains. The Department of Pesticide Regulation is issuing temporary guidelines Thursday, May 9, 2019, for chlorpyrifos while it considers long-term regulations. The department calls for banning its use in crop dusting, discontinuing it application on most crops and increasing buffer zones where it's sprayed. The pesticide is used on grapes, almonds and oranges and other crops. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, File)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under President Donald Trump reversed that effort after re-evaluating the science. Environmental groups and farmworkers challenged that decision and a federal appeals court last month ordered the EPA to decide by July whether to ban the pesticide.

"This is a historic victory for California's agricultural communities and for children nationwide," said Miriam Rotkin-Ellman, of the Natural Resources Defense Council. "The science clearly shows that chlorpyrifos is too dangerous to use in our fields. Since California uses more chlorpyrifos than any other state, this ban will not only protect kids who live here, but kids who eat the fruits and veggies grown here."

The pesticide is in a class of organophosphates chemically similar to a nerve gas developed by Nazi Germany before World War II. Its heavy use has often left traces in drinking water sources. A University of California at Berkeley study in 2012 found that 87% of umbilical-cord blood samples tested from newborn babies contained detectable levels of the pesticide.

Dr. Gina Solomon, a medical professor at the University of California, San Francisco, and former deputy secretary of Cal-EPA, said chlorpyrifos is unusual in that it's one of the best understood pesticides because it's been so extensively studied.

"We know a lot about what it does to developing children and that science is the bedrock of the action that Cal-EPA is announcing," she said. "Many pesticides have been studied well in lab rats but in this case we actually know what it does to people."

Studies in cities where the pesticide was once used to kill cockroaches before it was banned for indoor use in 2000 and in rural farmworker communities showed it harmed brain development in fetuses and affected reading ability, IQ and led to hyperactivity in children, Solomon said. Even head sizes were smaller in children whose mothers were exposed to the pesticide.

California to ban pesticide said to harm child development
In this May 13, 2004, file photo, a foreman watches workers pick fruit in an orchard in Arvin, Calif. The nation's most productive agricultural state will ban a widely used toxic pesticide blamed for harming brain development in babies, California officials said Wednesday, May 8, 2019. The Department of Pesticide Regulation issued temporary guidelines for chlorpyrifos that include banning it from crop dusting, discontinuing its use on most crops and increasing perimeters around where it's applied. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)

While the ban—technically known as a cancellation—could take up to two years to take effect, the state Department of Pesticide Regulation has recommended that county agriculture commissioners adopt stricter rules on where and how the chemical can be applied, including larger buffer zones.

Use of the pesticide has been reduced by more than half in California since 2005 to just under 1 million pounds (450,000 kilograms) used on crops in 2016, according to the state.

To help farmers make the transition away from chlorpyrifos, the state is adding a $5.7 million to fund development of safer alternatives.

While most environmental groups applauded the announcement, Earthjustice said it would continue pushing legislation to ban the chemical because it questions whether the Department of Pesticide Regulation will follow through.

"It's been like pulling teeth to force DPR to begin the cancellation process for chlorpyrifos," said Greg Loarie, Earthjustice attorney. "Until we know that chlorpyrifos is gone for good, we are going to keep pushing as hard as we can in as many places as we can."


Explore further

California recommends restrictions for popular pesticide

© 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

Citation: California to ban pesticide said to harm child development (2019, May 8) retrieved 19 May 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-apnewsbreak-california-outlaw-pesticide-kids.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
18 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more