Download the Big Bang on your smartphone

March 6, 2019 by Abha Eli Phoboo, CERN
The Big Bang app in action. Credit: Google Arts & Culture

Experience the 13.8-billion-year-old story of the universe in just seven minutes with CERN's new Big Bang app. Launched today at the Google Arts and Culture event in Washington D.C., the app, free and available for download, uses augmented or mixed reality to create an immersive adventure to our origin.

"One of CERN's missions is to educate and engage people from all over the world with science and technology. With this app, we hope to reach new audiences and share with everyone the story of the origin of our universe in an inspiring way," says Charlotte Warakaulle, CERN's Director of International Relations.

To activate the Big Bang AR app, the user must open and close their fist in view of their smartphone's camera. Voice-over instructions by Oscar-winning actress Tilda Swinton guides the user from the swirling soup of quark–gluon plasma, formation of protons and neutrons, evolution of atoms and molecules, birth of stars and planets, to the as we know it today. Besides the app, CERN has created five guided tours for Google Arts and Culture's Inventions and Discoveries page, including the Invention of the World Wide Web and discovery of the Higgs boson.

Credit: Google Arts & Culture

Explore further: CERN lab on the hunt for dark matter

More information: Play store: play.google.com/store/apps/det … id=ch.cern.BigBangAR

App store: itunes.apple.com/app/id1453396628

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RealityCheck
2.8 / 5 (4) Mar 06, 2019
Did I hear that trailer correctly? Approximately 30 seconds in, the narrator says:
13.8 Million (not Billion) years after the Big Bang....
Or is my computer's speaker making it sound like "Million" instead of Billion?
guptm
not rated yet Mar 06, 2019
It is the video director's fault. She could have pronounced 'billion' much clearly, or should have said in the end 'billion with b'. Young kids may easily get misled by incomplete/incorrect pronunciations.

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