China's Huawei set to unveil 5G phone with folding screen

China's Huawei set to unveil 5G phone with folding screen
In this Jan. 29, 2019, file photo, the logos of Huawei are displayed at its retail shop window reflecting the Ministry of Foreign Affairs office in Beijing. China's Huawei is set to take the wraps off a new folding-screen phone, in a fresh bid for global dominance of the stagnating smartphone market. The company is expected on Sunday, Feb. 24, 2019 to unveil the new device, which can be used on superfast next-generation mobile networks due to come online in the coming years. (AP Photo/Andy Wong, File)

China's Huawei is set to take the wraps off a new folding-screen phone, joining the latest trend for bendable devices as it challenges the global smartphone market's dominant players, Apple and Samsung.

The on Sunday plans to unveil the device, which can be used on superfast next-generation mobile networks that are due to come online in the coming years.

Update: Huawei unveils 5G phone with foldable screen

Huawei will reveal the phone on the eve of MWC Barcelona, a four-day showcase of mobile devices, as the company battles U.S. allegations it is a cybersecurity risk.

Device makers are looking to folding screens as the industry's next big thing to help them break out of an innovation malaise, although most analysts think the market is limited, at least in the early days.

Samsung recently revealed its own highly anticipated foldable smartphone, the Galaxy Fold, which comes complete with a hefty price tag of nearly $2,000.

Huawei Technologies is trying to raise its profile in the fiercely competitive smartphone market. Almost everyone with a smartphone has heard of Apple and Samsung, the top device makers, and Google, the power behind Android's pervasive software.

Huawei, a Chinese company with a name many people in the West don't know how to pronounce (it's "HWA-way"), wants to join the market's upper echelon.

It's getting close. Samsung was the No. 1 smartphone seller for all of last year, followed by Apple, according to research firm International Data Corp. Huawei came third, though in some quarters it took second place, IDC data showed.

The company stealthily became an industry star by plowing into new markets, honing its technology, and developing a line-up of phones that offer affordable options for low-income households and luxury models that are siphoning upper-crust sales from Apple and Samsung in China and Europe.

But Huawei's products are few and far between in the U.S. The scarcity stems from long-running security concerns that the company could facilitate digital espionage on behalf of China's government. Washington has been lobbying European allies to keep its equipment out of new 5G networks.

The cloud over Huawei also includes U.S. criminal charges filed last month against the company and its chief financial officer, Meng Wanzhou, who U.S. prosecutors want to extradite from Canada. They accuse her of fraud and say the company stole trade secrets, including technology that mobile carrier T-Mobile used to test smartphones.

Huawei is making its push at a time that both Samsung and Apple are struggling with declining sales amid a lull in industry innovation that is causing more consumers to hold on to the devices until they wear out instead of upgrading to the latest model as quickly as they once did.

The company sells high-priced smartphones as well as an extensive range of cheaper models priced from $200 to $600 that offer a good camera and other features most consumers want, analysts said.

But Huawei wouldn't be where it is today if it had been content focusing merely on China and other Asian markets.

The company took a huge step forward several years ago when it began pouring millions into promoting its brand and building partnerships in major European markets such as Germany, France, Britain, Spain and Italy. Research firm Gartner estimates it now sells about 13 percent of its phones in Europe.

As for the U.S., Huawei can only make so much headway as long as the government is casting the company as a cyber-villain, said Gartner analyst Tuong Nguyen.

"Brand building is a long-term exercise, but it's going to be especially difficult in the U.S. because of the way they have branded all of China," he said. "The barriers in the U.S. are just getting more difficult."


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Feb 24, 2019
I would not buy one of their phones or use any 5G devices they produce. As long as this country continues to break world law, spy and steal trade secrets, torture people, hold and abuse prisoners, militarily take over other countries and hassle fishermen and others in international waters, I will do my best to never consciously buy anything made in that country.
Taiwan, yes, but mainland China, NO!

Feb 24, 2019
They'll only come online if Huawei can prove they haven't already been hacked by Group 61398.

And given the amount of dancing they do trying not to admit it that's looking pretty unlikely.

Feb 24, 2019
They'll only come online if Huawei can prove they haven't already been hacked by Group 61398.

And given the amount of dancing they do trying not to admit it that's looking pretty unlikely.

Can other companies prove the same thing?

Feb 24, 2019
Well, we covered this before. America made hacking computer systems & programming a normal practice by USAcronym agencies since the 1950's.

We taught the rest of the World how to behave like jerks, Cause us Yanks, sure as hell, won't leave money lying on the table.
We earned our reputation.

What you resent is that China learned too well, that they may turn out to be better predators then we are.

My father, fluent in French language & dialects, was career US Army. From the 1950's to about 1970, the units he worked in were spying on France & other French-speaking nations.

& there is nothing new about this. What do you think an embassy military attache is doing? Cutting paper-dolls?

The marriage of Edward & Wallis was a scandal because the Brits suspected her for her previous marriage to a US Naval Attache. Who were notorious for using their wives as bait, assets.

Your outrage at China is like the promiscuous priest preaching abstinence.

Utter hypocrisy.

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