Carbon Capture and Storage project publishes findings

February 20, 2019, University of Liverpool
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

The ACT Acorn project, an international research project which involves University geology experts, has announced the findings of its research into the feasibility of establishing a carbon capture and storage facility in the North Sea.

Carbon capture and storage (CCS) involves capturing (CO2) emissions, transporting it and securely storing it in under the sea, where the geology is suitable.

The University provided expertise in geology and rock deformation to the ACT Acorn project to check whether the and caprock at two potential storage sites in the North Sea were suitable for the injection and long-term storage of CO2.

The team analysed multiple sandstone and caprock samples using highly specialist equipment which is unique to the University's Rock Deformation and Diagenesis Laboratories. Samples were tested for their porosity, permeability, mineral content and their strength under pressure.

Liverpool Geologist, Professor Richard Worden, presented the results of his geochemical, mineralogical, petrological analysis of the sandstone and caprock, and the results of tests to measure the rocks' strength under pressure at an event in London.

He said: "We were able to use specialist high-pressure deformation apparatus in our Rock Deformation Laboratory to test the geology and strength of the sandstone and caprock and to replicate the conditions experienced down at the reservoir depth.

"We found that at both potential storage sites the sandstone and caprock had the right levels of porosity and permeability necessary for the injection and long term storage of CO2.

"Our contribution to this project continues Liverpool's nine year track record of high impact research into CCS."

The key findings from the ACT Acorn project confirmed that the UK's existing North Sea oil and gas transport infrastructure, coupled with an impressive natural CO2 geological storage resource, offers significant benefits and value. It ultimately ranked the North Sea's East May and Captain Sandstone formations as the top sites, selected out of 16 possible sites.

Explore further: Prospective carbon capture site lacks ceiling

Related Stories

Prospective carbon capture site lacks ceiling

January 31, 2014

Researchers' early attempts to find a Perth Basin site to sequester carbon have detected a suitable porous aquifer, but they are yet to find a non-porous cap rock to contain it.

Keep a lid on it: Geologists probe geological carbon storage

July 28, 2016

Effective carbon capture and storage or "CCS" in underground reservoirs is one possible way to meet ambitious climate change targets demanded by countries and international partnerships around the world. But are current technologies ...

Recommended for you

Galactic center visualization delivers star power

March 21, 2019

Want to take a trip to the center of the Milky Way? Check out a new immersive, ultra-high-definition visualization. This 360-movie offers an unparalleled opportunity to look around the center of the galaxy, from the vantage ...

Ultra-sharp images make old stars look absolutely marvelous

March 21, 2019

Using high-resolution adaptive optics imaging from the Gemini Observatory, astronomers have uncovered one of the oldest star clusters in the Milky Way Galaxy. The remarkably sharp image looks back into the early history of ...

When more women make decisions, the environment wins

March 21, 2019

When more women are involved in group decisions about land management, the group conserves more—particularly when offered financial incentives to do so, according to a new University of Colorado Boulder study published ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.