'No evidence' of Huawei spying, says German IT watchdog

Huawei has faced increasing scrutiny over its alleged links to Chinese intelligence services, prompting countries like the Unite
Huawei has faced increasing scrutiny over its alleged links to Chinese intelligence services, prompting countries like the United States, Australia and Japan to block it from building their next-generation, super-fast 5G internet networks

Germany's IT watchdog has expressed scepticism about calls for a boycott of Chinese telecoms giant Huawei, saying it has seen no evidence the firm could use its equipment to spy for Beijing, news weekly Spiegel reported Friday.

"For such serious decisions like a ban, you need proof," the head of Germany's Federal Office for Information Security (BSI), Arne Schoenbohm, told Spiegel, adding that his agency had no such evidence.

Huawei has faced increasing scrutiny over its alleged links to Chinese intelligence services, prompting countries like the United States, Australia and Japan to block it from building their next-generation, super-fast 5G internet networks.

The US has put pressure on Germany to follow suit, Spiegel wrote.

Schoenbohm said BSI experts had examined Huawei products and components from around the world.

They had also visited Huawei's newly opened lab in Bonn, where German clients can inspect the firm's cyber security measures and the software behind its products.

But some observers raised eyebrows at the BSI's apparent dismissal of cyber security risks concerning Huawei.

"I believe it's wrong to suggest that the concerns about Chinese espionage are unfounded and easy to detect," telecom security expert Ronja Kniep told AFP.

"Even if Huawei has no official relationship with the Chinese government, that doesn't mean Chinese services aren't using the company and its technology as vehicles for espionage."

All three of Germany's main mobile network operators use infrastructure provided by Huawei, Spiegel pointed out.

The Chinese firm is also the brand behind some of Germany's most popular mobile phones.


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US urging allies to shun Huawei: WSJ

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Citation: 'No evidence' of Huawei spying, says German IT watchdog (2018, December 14) retrieved 16 October 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-12-evidence-huawei-spying-german-watchdog.html
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Dec 14, 2018
That's no surprise.

Dec 14, 2018
That's no surprise.


Especially after Germany has forged so many new trade deals with China. The German auto-industry is drooling to get into the far east after fouling its own reputation in the west.

https://pjmedia.c...ade-war/

Volkswagen earlier this year announced that it would invest $18 billion in China by 2022 and construct six plants to build electric vehicles. BMW will move some of its SUV production out of its South Carolina plant
Daimler will start to test self-driving cars in Beijing.
Chemical giant BASF will spend $10 billion on a second giant facility in China. And Siemens will develop gas turbines together with China's State Power Investment Co.

Dec 15, 2018
halting technological advancement by scaremongering the hell out of government.

This is especially dubious as the only witness for this claim is only 1 (one) country, which tell all other country what they should think.

There's not even enough corroboration from inside the country itself, with only one source (Bloomberg Tech) airing a single piece about mysterious chip on motherboard that only trending once and none to be heard again.

Soo much for 'leaks' with CNN suddenly airing CGI of "Russian Doll" satellite and Satellite image of "F-117 Nighthawk" on someone's backyard in China.

Dec 15, 2018
If government in other country strike a deal to use Microsoft Windows 10 on their computers, I bet there's same opposition claiming it's a backdoor to their national security.

it's simply an irrational scaremongering at its best, especially since you know that it never happened.

There, you see? there's real life example in front of your Eye, you are using it, still you can't relate to Huawei?

Dec 15, 2018
The only question here is who got bought.

Quick refresher: absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

Dec 15, 2018
Especially when someone is trying to hide the evidence.

Dec 15, 2018
The only question here is who got bought.

someone working for central intelligence.

this is not impossible. Mind you, how do you think Edward Snowden can just walk out of NSA & meet people outside of security clearance?

how do you explain the falsification of Intelligence regarding Iraqi Weapon Of Mass Destruction that lead to costly war?

Dec 15, 2018
So...
I guess my Lenovo laptop is suspect, too....

Dec 15, 2018
So...
I guess my Lenovo laptop is suspect, too....

well in Lenovo case there's civilian security expert who can testify & explain what's wrong with it and the company respond to it.

In Huawei case, nobody speak, no civilian expert elaborate on it, and the company didn't show any reaction either.

really, this isn't flowing the way it used to be, it's suspicious.

Dec 18, 2018
there is nothing suspicious about a government, they are transparent as saran wrap. If you believe the government is about its people you must be half-baked with saran wrap around your head trying to gasp for air.

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