Musk to workers: Perform for profit, prove 'naysayers wrong'

Musk to workers: Perform for profit, prove 'naysayers wrong'
In this Dec. 14, 2016, file photo, Tesla CEO Elon Musk listens as President-elect Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with technology industry leaders at Trump Tower in New York. Electric carmaker Tesla must find a new chair for its board of directors under a settlement announced Saturday, Sept. 29, 2018, with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Whoever takes on the job will face the formidable task of overseeing Musk, a charismatic, visionary executive with an impulsive streak. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Tesla founder Elon Musk is telling his employees to work hard on the last day of the quarter to prove "the naysayers wrong."

In a Sept. 30 email, filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on Monday, Musk says the electric car maker is nearing profitability.

The commission had filed a lawsuit, saying Musk's tweet about taking the company private constituted securities fraud because Musk knew he hadn't lined up the money for the deal.

Musk reached a settlement with the regulators, announced Saturday. He is staying on as CEO.

Musk's email says: "We are very close to achieving profitability and proving the naysayers wrong, but, to be certain, we must execute really well tomorrow (Sunday)."

It says the company will achieve "an epic victory beyond all expectations."


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Citation: Musk to workers: Perform for profit, prove 'naysayers wrong' (2018, October 2) retrieved 20 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-10-musk-workers-profit-naysayers-wrong.html
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