More than 100 baby turtles reported stolen on Galapagos islands

October 5, 2018
A baby giant turtle stands next to eggs at a breeding centre at the Galapagos National Park, in Santa Cruz island, Ecuador

A total of 123 baby giant turtles have been stolen from a breeding facility in the Galapagos islands, a lawmaker from Ecuador's prized archipelago in the Pacific told AFP.

"They were all taken at once, 123 in all. It was a robbery," Washington Paredes said by phone on Thursday. He said it happened Tuesday of last week.

Galapagos National Park said it was preparing a statement on the alleged theft of the hatchlings from a facility on Isabela, one of the .

Lumbering adult giant are a beloved symbol of the islands that inspired Charles Darwin's theory of evolution.

The Environment Ministry also said it would issue a statement when it had official information.

Paredes complained that the breeding facility where the theft occurred was poorly protected, with no security cameras or light sensors.

"The turtles are just there. If somebody wants to go in by night and steal, they can," he said.

In June, 26 adult turtles that had been smuggled to Peru were returned to the islands.

Twelve species of giant turtles live on the islands, which are a United Nations natural heritage site.

Explore further: Tonnes of garbage cleaned up from Galapagos coast

Related Stories

Tonnes of garbage cleaned up from Galapagos coast

March 18, 2018

Officials at Ecuador's Galapagos National Park say they have collected 22 tonnes of garbage since January off the coasts of the pristine archipelago, some of it from as far away as Asia.

Galapagos iguanas transferred due to overpopulation

May 30, 2018

Six land iguanas, endemic to the Galapagos Islands, have been relocated within the Pacific archipelago due to food shortages and overpopulation on the islet where they lived, Ecuador's Galapagos National Park said Tuesday.

Breeding season under way for Galapagos tortoises

January 10, 2013

Breeding season is under way for the endangered tortoises of Ecuador's Galapagos Islands, whose mating and nesting habits are carefully watched by wildlife specialists hoping to save them from extinction.

Recommended for you

Study shows city rats eat better than country rats

October 17, 2018

A pair of researchers, one with Trent University in Canada, the other the University of Manchester in the U.K. has found evidence that rats living in cities have a much richer diet than rats living in the country. In their ...

A curious branch of plankton evolution

October 17, 2018

Planktonic foraminifera (forams) - tiny, shelled organisms that float in the sea—left behind one of the most complete fossil records of evolutionary history in deep sea deposits. Consequently, evolutionists have a relatively ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.