NASA blasts off space laser satellite to track ice loss

September 15, 2018
Cloaked in pre-dawn darkness, the $1 billion, half-ton ICESat-2 launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Vandenberg Air Force base in California at 6:02 am (1302 GMT)

NASA's most advanced space laser satellite blasted off Saturday on a mission to track ice loss around the world and improve forecasts of sea level rise as the climate warms.

Cloaked in pre-dawn darkness, the $1 billion, half-ton ICESat-2 launched aboard a Delta II rocket from Vandenberg Air Force base in California at 6:02 am (1302 GMT).

"Three, two one, liftoff!" said a launch commentator on NASA television.

"Lifting ICESat-2 on a quest to explore the of our constantly changing home planet."

The launch marks the first time in nearly a decade that NASA has had a tool in orbit to measure ice sheet surface elevation across the globe.

The preceding , ICESat, launched in 2003 and ended in 2009.

The first ICESat revealed that sea ice was thinning, and ice cover was disappearing from coastal areas in Greenland and Antarctica.

In the intervening nine years, an aircraft mission called Operation IceBridge, has flown over the Arctic and Antarctic, taking height measurements of the changing ice.

But a view from space—especially with the latest technology—should be far more precise.

An update is particularly urgent since global average temperatures have climbed year after year, with four of the hottest years in modern times all taking place from 2014-2017.

Graphic on NASA's ICESat-2 mission.

"Loss of things like the sea ice that covers the Arctic ocean affects our weather, and loss of ice that covers Greenland and Antarctica raises sea level," said Tom Wagner, cryosphere program scientist at NASA.

He added that the satellite should reveal new insights into the ice in the deep interior of Antarctica, which is area of mystery to scientists.

Potent laser

The new will fire 10,000 times in one second, compared to the original ICESat which fired 40 times a second.

Measurements will be taken every 2.3 feet (0.7 meters) along the satellite's path.

"The mission will gather enough data to estimate the annual elevation change in the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets even if it's as slight as four millimeters – the width of a No. 2 pencil," NASA said in a statement.

Importantly, the laser will measure the slope and height of the ice, not just the area it covers.

The launch marks the first time in nearly a decade that NASA has had a tool in orbit to measure ice sheet surface elevation across the globe

"Our data will allow ice sheet modelers to make better predictions of the future," said Tom Neumann, deputy project scientist for ICESat-2.

Though powerful, the laser will not be hot enough to melt ice from its vantage point some 300 miles (500 kilometers) above the Earth, NASA said.

The mission is meant to last three years but has enough fuel to continue for 10, if mission managers decide to extend its life.

Explore further: NASA space lasers to reveal new depths of planet's ice loss

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4 comments

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V4Vendicar
1 / 5 (4) Sep 16, 2018
This Anti-God Liberal Science must be de-funded now before those NASA communists do more damage to the Economy.
Ken_Fabian
5 / 5 (4) Sep 16, 2018
This Anti-God Liberal Science must be de-funded now before those NASA communists do more damage to the Economy.


Is this seriously meant or mockery? Absent any clues otherwise I must suppose it is serious, despite my initial reaction.

Presuming God would not want climate and energy politics and humankind's choices to be based on accurate and factual information seems an extraordinary as well as baseless claim to me. It doesn't even work as valid theology to dismiss and ignore the uses of observation, intelligence and reason to make sense of our world - and to foresee the consequences of our actions.

I expect IceSAT2 will confirm, with greater precision, what we already know - land based ice in Antarctic and Greenland is being lost to melting at increasing rates. Unfortunately, like existing observational evidence, that we have in sufficient abundance, the politics of climate responsibility avoidance will require undermining public confidence in it.
leetennant
5 / 5 (5) Sep 16, 2018
This Anti-God Liberal Science must be de-funded now before those NASA communists do more damage to the Economy.


Is this seriously meant or mockery? Absent any clues otherwise I must suppose it is serious, despite my initial reaction.


This is why Poe's Law is dead. No, these Russian sock puppets are as serious as funded troll accounts can be.
EnricM
5 / 5 (2) Sep 17, 2018
Strange that this passed under the radar of the Trumpeteers.

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