At 60, NASA shoots for revival of moon glory days

July 27, 2018
Credit: CC0 Public Domain

Sixty years ago, spurred by competition with the Soviet Union, the United States created NASA, launching a journey that would take Americans to the moon within a decade.

Since then, the US space agency has seen glorious achievements and crushing failures in its drive to push the frontiers of , including a fatal launch pad fire in 1967 that killed three and two deadly shuttle explosions in 1986 and 2003 that took 14 lives.

Now, NASA is struggling to redefine itself in an increasingly crowded field of international space agencies and commercial interests, with its sights set on returning to deep space.

These bold goals make for soaring rhetoric, but experts worry the cash just isn't there to meet the timelines of reaching the moon in the next decade and Mars by the 2030s.

And NASA's inability to send astronauts to space—a capacity lost in 2011 when the ended, as planned, after 30 years—is a lasting blemish on the agency's stellar image.

While US private industries toil on new crew spaceships, NASA still must pay Russia $80 million per seat for US astronauts to ride to space on a Soyuz capsule.

How it started

In 1957, the Soviet Union launched the first satellite into space with Sputnik 1, while US attempts were failing miserably.

The US government was already working on reaching space, but mainly under the guise of the military.

President Dwight D. Eisenhower appealed to Congress to create a separate, civilian space agency to better focus on space exploration.

He signed the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Authorization Act into law on July 29, 1958.

NASA opened its doors in October 1958, with about 8,000 employees and a budget of $100 million.

Space race

The Soviets won another key part of the in April 1961 when Yuri Gagarin became the first person to orbit the Earth.

A month later, John F. Kennedy unveiled plans to land a man on the moon by decade's end.

"No single space project in this period will be more impressive to mankind, or more important for the long-range exploration of space; and none will be so difficult or expensive to accomplish," the US president said.

The Apollo program was born.

In 1962, astronaut John Glenn became the first American to orbit the Earth. In 1969, NASA astronaut Neil Armstrong became the first man to walk on the moon.

American astronauts of the era were national heroes—military pilots with the combination of brains, guts and grit that became known famously as "The Right Stuff," the title of the classic Tom Wolfe book.

Armstrong's words as he set foot on the lunar surface—"one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind"—were heard by millions around the world.

"Apollo was a unilateral demonstration of national power," recalled John Logsdon, professor emeritus at George Washington University's Space Policy Institute.

"It was Kennedy deciding to use the space program as an instrument of overt geopolitical competition that turned NASA into an instrument of national policy, with a very significant budget share," he told AFP.

A total of five percent of the national budget went to NASA in the Apollo era.

Now, NASA gets about $18 billion a year, less than a half percent of the federal budget, "and it is no longer the same instrument of national policy," Logsdon said.

New era

More glory days followed in the 1980s with the birth of NASA's shuttle program, a bus-sized re-usable spacecraft that ferried astronauts into space, and eventually to the International Space Station, which began operation in 1998.

But what is NASA today?

President Donald Trump has championed a return to the moon, calling for a lunar gateway that would allow a continuous stream of spacecraft and people to visit the moon, and serve as a leaping off point for Mars.

Trump has also called for the creation of a "Space Force," a sixth branch of the military that would be focused on defending US interests.

NASA has long been viewed as a global leader in space innovation, but today the international field is vastly more populated than 60 years ago.

"Now you have something like 70 countries that are one way or another involved in space activity," said Logsdon.

Rather than competing against international space agencies, "the emphasis has shifted to cooperation" to cut costs and speed innovation, said Teasel Muir-Harmony, curator at the National Air and Space Museum.

'How can NASA take advantage of this?'

NASA administrator Jim Bridenstine told a recent panel discussion he is keen to work with other countries that are striving toward space.

He mentioned the possibility of boosting cooperation with China, and how he recently traveled to Israel to meet with commercial interests that are at work on a moon lander.

Bridenstine said the reason for his visit was to find out "how are you doing this, what are you doing and is there a way NASA can take advantage of it?"

NASA is backing away from low Earth orbit, looking to hand the space station over to commercial interests after 2024, and spending millions in seed money to help private companies like SpaceX and Boeing build capsules to carry humans to in the coming years.

In this environment, Bridenstine said figuring out what NASA does, versus what it buys as a service from commercial providers, will be "one of the fundamental challenges I think I am going to face over my tenure."

Bridenstine said Trump's budget requests for NASA have been "very generous."

With its eyes on a crew mission to the moon in just five years' time, NASA plans to devote about $10 billion of its nearly $20 billion budget for 2019 to lunar exploration.

Bridenstine's predecessor at NASA's helm, retired astronaut Charles Bolden, sounded a note of caution against repeating the mistakes of the shuttle era, when the United States ended its human exploration program without another spacecraft ready to take its place.

"We cannot tolerate another gap like that," Bolden said.

"It is really critical for NASA to facilitate the success of commercial entities to take over" in low Earth orbit, some 250 miles (400 kilometers) above the planet.

"And then for NASA to do what it does so well. Be the leader in lunar orbit."

Explore further: New NASA boss gets 'hearty congratulations' from space

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starzdust2011
5 / 5 (1) Jul 27, 2018
Well, one half of one percent seems a bit too cheap. It will not get the US to the Moon or anywhere else. So, why not at least increase NASA's budget to a whole 1% and see what that gets us to. If still not enough funding keep increasing the budget by 1% each budget year until NASA has the money to get us there in a reasonable time frame.
I bite my lips while awaiting to hear NASA has the Webb telescope ready to fly. Seems like an awful long time slips that prevent it from getting to space. I wonder if NASA has bit off more than they can do with the technology in regards to Webb and perhaps it may never reach space due to technical issues not capable of being resolved. L2 or bust!
V4Vendicar
1 / 5 (1) Jul 27, 2018
"why not at least increase NASA's budget to a whole 1% and see what that gets us to." - Starzust2011

Don't be silly. That money was transferred to America's wealthiest people and corporations decades ago.

Republicans wan't NASA abolished so that they can move even more money to their benefactors.
V4Vendicar
not rated yet Jul 27, 2018

John-Charles Hewitt, "Smash the State"

Socialism can't calculate.

It's economically impossible for anything that NASA or any other government agency does to meet a market need (provide a good that people actually demand).

Furthermore, the agency rests on theft to support itself.

The historical context of NASA is also especially pernicious, considering that it was a vast transfer of wealth from a populace to serve the purpose of a statist dick-measuring competition between superpowers. At the time of the extravagant moon landing, the populace was struggling through a severe recession and undergoing a low-grade civil war over race, the Vietnam war, and other issues.

Celebrating NASA is like a particularly slavish peasant cheering the construction of Versailles.

NASA also placed ICBMs into the hands of psychotic statists.

V4Vendicar
not rated yet Jul 27, 2018
"Libertarians" who argue without a moral basis are just statists wearing a goofy libertarian costume. You either abide by the non-aggression principle or not.

Of course, Milton Friedman supported government science, but I don't consider him a libertarian for the aforementioned reasons.

If you want to explore the stars, tell the government to stop pointing guns at people who would otherwise be starting extensive private space programs. If you dislike monopolies, tell the NASA cartel to get bent.
unrealone1
not rated yet Jul 28, 2018
Is there any Moon video showing the Astronauts at 1/6 of Earth's gravity?

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