Secrets of the Big Bang and dark matter

June 28, 2018, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
The new particle accelerator experiment Belle II searches for the origin of the universe. Credit: Felix Metzner, KIT

At the Japanese Research Center for Particle Physics KEK, the new particle accelerator experiment Belle II started operation after eight years of construction. Scientists from all over the world eagerly waited for news on the first collisions. 20 researchers of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) are involved in the experiment. Based on the Belle II data, they want to study the events after the big bang and to find out the secret of dark matter. Yesterday evening at 5.23 pm German time, first data were measured.

The Belle II detector was conceived in 2010 as the successor of the successful Belle experiment that had been carried out from 1999 to 2010 and enabled some remarkable findings in physical fundamental research. Belle II is located at KEK, a research center about 55 km northeast of Tokyo in Tsukuba, Ibaraki prefecture, Japan. In this , electrons with opposed anti- collide and produce and leptons, particles that no longer exist in today's universe. "While the Large Hadron Collider at CERN is the accelerator with the highest energies – this is where the Higgs boson was discovered in 2012 -, the Japanese super accelerator has the world's highest luminosity, a hundred times higher than that of facilities operated so far," says Florian Bernlochner, Professor at KIT's Institute of Experimental Particle Physics.

Based on the data, researchers want to explore precisely the events shortly after the . Generation of so-called b-quarks and their anti-particles is of particular interest. Up to 50 billions of these matter-anti-matter pairs are to be produced in the next eight years. After a lifetime of just about one and a half trillionths of a second (10-12s), these heavy quarks decay into lighter, stable particles. Doing this, they violate the so-called CP symmetry (this discovery was granted a Nobel Prize in 2012), as matter and anti-matter show a slightly different behavior during decay.

The blue lines are reconstructed tracks, the magenta and cyan-colored circles are hits in the track chamber, while the red histograms present energy depositions in the Belle II calorimeter. The green boxes are hits in the KL detector (an instrumented yoke to detect myons or long-lived kaons). Credit: KEK
"This asymmetry, however, is not sufficient to explain why a surplus of matter remained in the early universe after cooling. Today's visible world is composed of this surplus," Professor Bernlochner says.

For this reason, the Belle II experiment searches for new sources of CP violation as well as new phenomena and elementary particles. Searches for will be of particular importance. Dark matter is not directly visible and only weakly interacts with normal : The Belle II experiment will be able to search for medium-light particles with so far unreached precision.

One of the first collision events. Credit: KEK

Several institutes of KIT have made important contributions to the Belle II experiment: The Institute for Theoretical Particle Physics was largely involved in the development of the planned program. The Institute of Experimental Particle Physics developed and implemented many algorithms to reconstruct real particles from the electronic signals of the detector. Only with their help can the collisions be analyzed. And the data of the meanwhile completed Belle experiment were used for important preliminary studies relating to the physical phenomena that are to be measured now. The Institute for Information Processing Technology developed new hardware to search for new phenomena in rare decays of tau-leptons. The Institute for Data Processing and Electronics and the ASIC and Detector Laboratory developed the radiation-resistant microchips for the activation and read-out of pixel sensors.

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fthompson495
1 / 5 (1) Jun 28, 2018
The energy described in the following article at the scale of our Universe's super-supermassive black hole is dark energy.

'Black holes banish matter into cosmic voids'
http://www.spaced...999.html

"Some of the matter falling towards the [supermassive black] holes is converted into energy. This energy is delivered to the surrounding gas, and leads to large outflows of matter, which stretch for hundreds of thousands of light years from the black holes, reaching far beyond the extent of their host galaxies."

Our visible universe is in the outflow of a super-supermassive black hole. As ordinary matter falls toward the super-supermassive black hole it evaporates into dark matter. It is the dark matter outflow which pushes the galaxy clusters, causing them to move outward and away from us. The dark matter outflow is dark energy.
rrwillsj
3.7 / 5 (3) Jun 28, 2018
If our 'visible universe is an outflow of your alleged s-smbh, what about the in-visible such as Gravity? You know the part that really matters. (rimshot).
Where is this s-smbh located?
How did you observe it?
Or. can you at least produce evidence of it's existence before there was any mass to result in a bh?
Does the s-smbh continue to exist?
You seem to have confused the actual singularity and the accretion disk around it. What gets pulled into the singularity is gone. Wherever the hell that might be.
What we observe is all the stellar debris and dust and gases. Playing demolition derby in a chaotic maelstrom of a torus orbiting the singularity.
Upon what evidence do you make your claim that dark matter is simultaneously entering and exiting the singularity. Since you seem to be one of the few who can 'see' a singularity and 'see' dark matter.
Upon what evidence do you base your claim that it is 'outflowing' dark natter that is performing the task of dark energy?
Da Schneib
3 / 5 (2) Jun 28, 2018
Belle was a very successful experiment; it found that the asymmetry in the kaons is duplicated by similar asymmetry in neutral B-mesons, particles which include a bottom quark. It also sensitively measured the CKM matrix mixing angles for the charm-to-bottom and up-to-bottom quark transitions, among other important results. Belle II will probe more deeply into these matters, further refining the measurements and continuing the world-wide search for physics beyond the standard model. Congratulations to the team on "first light" for this important experiment.
fthompson495
1 / 5 (1) Jun 29, 2018
@rwillsj, The supersolid dark matter displaced by the Earth, pushing back and exerting pressure toward the Earth, is gravity.

What is referred to geometrically as curved spacetime physically exists in nature as the state of displacement of the supersolid dark matter. The state of displacement of the supersolid dark matter is gravity.
antialias_physorg
3.7 / 5 (3) Jun 29, 2018
he supersolid dark matter displaced by the Earth, pushing back and exerting pressure toward the Earth, is gravity

And this is why gravity is stronger on one side of the Earth than on the other, right?
fthompson495
1 / 5 (1) Jun 29, 2018

And this is why gravity is stronger on one side of the Earth than on the other, right?


'NASA's Gravity Probe B Confirms Two Einstein Space-Time Theories'
http://www.nasa.g...lts.html

"Imagine the Earth as if it were immersed in honey. As the planet rotates, the honey around it would swirl, and it's the same with space and time"

Honey has mass and so does the supersolid dark matter. The swirl is the state of displacement of the dark matter connected to and neighboring the Earth.

The supersolid dark matter displaced by the Earth pushing back and exerting pressure toward the Earth is gravity. What is referred to geometrically as curved spacetime physically exists in nature as the state of displacement of the dark matter. The state of displacement of the supersolid dark matter is gravity.
rrwillsj
3 / 5 (2) Jun 29, 2018
We are too "imagine"? How about instead of "imagining" we analyze the actual data collected to come up with our conclusions? You know all that tediously messy empirical evidence to support our illation.
kurtstocklmeir
not rated yet Jun 29, 2018
for years I have talked about this - it could be true there are more anti neutrinos than neutrinos and that makes a balance between matter and anti matter - all forces get stronger as they travel gravitons get more energy as they travel because they create attraction, influence the vacuum and make time and space have a shape - there is not any dark matter Kurt Stocklmeir
fthompson495
1 / 5 (1) Jun 29, 2018
We are too "imagine"? How about instead of "imagining" we analyze the actual data collected to come up with our conclusions? You know all that tediously messy empirical evidence to support our illation.


"imagine" is what is quoted from the article. The empirical evidence is the dark matter is a supersolid that is displaced by visible matter. The Milky Way's halo is lopsided due to the Milky Way moving through and displacing the supersolid dark matter, analogous to a submarine moving through and displacing the water.
rrwillsj
3 / 5 (2) Jun 29, 2018
KS, If gravitons exist? They neither "gather energy" nor "create attraction". Otherwise Gravity would not be a Constant.

A vacuum is by definition, consisting of nothing at all. It would be more reasonable to say that "Time" is neutral to Gravity That "Space" is deformed by Gravity.

Until the evidence proves otherwise.

t4, your metaphor falls apart at, a submarine is a (hopefully!) solid object moving through a fluid medium of particulate matter.

A galaxy is a mass of stars and gases and particulate materials. Bound together in a gravitational amalgamate. When two galaxies collide, what is observed are the gases interacting, being deformed by each galaxies organizing gravity field. The stars slip right past one another. It would be a mighty rare event, even across tens of billions of years for two stars to collide.

The water a submarine travels through is trying to avoid the submarine. Water getting inside a submarine would be a very bad thing!
gunnqu
not rated yet Jun 30, 2018
RUNII: No SUSY, No WIMP, No HIGGS, No NEW PHYSICS?
http://vixra.org/...40v2.pdf
https://www.econo...ysicists
"Whether politicians and taxpayers will be up for this remains to be seen. That fundamental physics has got as far as it has is, essentially, a legacy of its delivery to political leaders of the mid-20th century of the atom and hydrogen bombs. The consequence of this was that physicists were able to ask for expensive toys—for who knew what else they might come up with. That legacy has now been spent, though, and any privilege physics once had has evaporated. This risks leaving in permanent limbo not only the GUTs and their brethren, but also the sceptical idea of Dr Hossenfelder that the Standard Model really is all there is. And that would surely be the most depressing result of all."?

https://youtu.be/uvHalv2f5oM
rrwillsj
not rated yet Jul 01, 2018
The godlings are all squabbling over which of them will be blamed for screwing up creation. Coyote, the trickster deity, lurks in the back laughing at all them.

Like I said, Stupid Design explains everything!

Especially these commentaries....
Seeker2
not rated yet Jul 04, 2018
'Black holes banish matter into cosmic voids'
http://www.spaced...999.html

"Some of the matter falling towards the [supermassive black] holes is converted into energy. This energy is delivered to the surrounding gas, and leads to large outflows of matter, which stretch for hundreds of thousands of light years from the black holes, reaching far beyond the extent of their host galaxies."

Our visible universe is in the outflow of a super-supermassive black hole. As ordinary matter falls toward the super-supermassive black hole it evaporates into dark matter. It is the dark matter outflow which pushes the galaxy clusters, causing them to move outward and away from us. The dark matter outflow is dark energy.
Starting to make sense. I see images of spacemen being what they call spaghettified falling into black holes.
Seeker2
not rated yet Jul 04, 2018
cont
So I should think all the binding energy holding together quantified matter must be released back to the cosmos. Then they talk about matter being compressed down to a singularity, whatever is left of it after being stripped of its energy content. You can't blame people for being mystified.

If indeed the energy content of matter is redistributed then how could it continue to grow and increase its gravitational force? If you define gravity as a difference in the energy density of spacetime then we avoid this confusion about matter content and the force of gravity starts to make sense. But that opens up another can of worms.

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