Scientists in Germany seek to find mass of neutrino

June 11, 2018

Researchers in Germany have started collecting data with a 60 million euro ($71 million) machine designed to help determine the mass of the universe's lightest particle.

Physicists, engineers and technicians at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology hope the 200-metric ton (220-ton) device will narrow down or even pinpoint the actual mass of . Those are sometimes called "ghost " because they're so difficult to detect.

Scientists with the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino experiment, or KATRIN, said Monday they'll be taking measurements "well into the next decade" and hope to produce "high-impact results."

Researchers say determining the of neutrinos is one of the most important open questions in particle physics and will help scientists better understand the history of the universe.

Some 200 people from 20 institutions in seven countries are working on the project.

Explore further: Experiment to weigh 'ghost particles' starts in Germany

More information: Press release: phys.org/wire-news/290240092/n … t-precise-scale.html

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Sculpting stable structures in pure liquids

February 21, 2019

Oscillating flow and light pulses can be used to create reconfigurable architecture in liquid crystals. Materials scientists can carefully engineer concerted microfluidic flows and localized optothermal fields to achieve ...

How to freeze heat conduction

February 21, 2019

Physicists have discovered a new effect, which makes it possible to create excellent thermal insulators which conduct electricity. Such materials can be used to convert waste heat into electrical energy.

Water is more homogeneous than expected

February 21, 2019

In order to explain the known anomalies in water, some researchers assume that water consists of a mixture of two phases, even under ambient conditions. However, new X-ray spectroscopic analyses at BESSY II, ESRF and Swiss ...

Correlated nucleons may solve 35-year-old mystery

February 20, 2019

A careful re-analysis of data taken at the Department of Energy's Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has revealed a possible link between correlated protons and neutrons in the nucleus and a 35-year-old mystery. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.