Video: Why cake donuts and yeast donuts are so different

May 31, 2018, American Chemical Society
Credit: The American Chemical Society

Donuts are universally beloved. But there's a significant sensory difference between biting into a cake donut and biting into a yeast-raised donut.

The ingredients are almost identical, and in both cases, the dough is deep-fried.

In this video, Reactions takes on the secret chemistry of donuts:

Explore further: Video: The chemistry of fried chicken

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