Scientists harvest 1st vegetables in Antarctic greenhouse

April 5, 2018
Scientists harvest 1st vegetables in Antarctic greenhouse
The undated photo provided by the German aerospace center (DLR) shows engineer Paul Zabel with fresh salad he harvested in the EDEN-ISS greenhouse at the Neumeyer-Station III on Antarctica. The project without soil but with a closed water cycle, optimized lightnng and carbon dioxide levels is a test to become part of the nutrition for astronauts in future moon or Mars missions. (DLR via AP)

Scientists in Antarctica have harvested their first crop of vegetables grown without earth, daylight or pesticides as part of a project designed to help astronauts cultivate fresh food on other planets.

Researchers at Germany's Neumayer Station III say they've picked 3.6 kilograms (8 pounds) of salad greens, 18 cucumbers and 70 radishes grown inside a high-tech greenhouse as temperatures outside dropped below -20 degrees Celsius (-4 Fahrenheit).

The German Aerospace Center DLR, which coordinates the project, said Thursday that by May scientists hope to harvest 4-5 kilograms of fruit and vegetables a week.

While NASA has successfully grown greens on the International Space Station, DLR's Daniel Schubert says the Antarctic project aims to produce a wider range of vegetables that might one day be grown on Mars or the Moon.

Scientists harvest 1st vegetables in Antarctic greenhouse
The undated photo provided by the German aerospace center (DLR) shows radish before being harvested in the EDEN-ISS greenhouse at the Neumeyer-Station III on Antarctica. The project without soil but with a closed water cycle, optimized lightning and carbon dioxide levels is a test to become part of the nutrition for astronauts in future moon or Mars missions. (DLR via AP)

Scientists harvest 1st vegetables in Antarctic greenhouse
The undated photo provided by the German aerospace center (DLR) shows various salads which were harvested in the EDEN-ISS greenhouse at the Neumeyer-Station III on Antarctica. The project without soil but with a closed water cycle, optimized lightning and carbon dioxide levels is a test to become part of the nutrition for astronauts in future moon or Mars missions. (DLR via AP)

Explore further: Cargo-packed Dragon arrives at space station

Related Stories

Cargo-packed Dragon arrives at space station

April 4, 2018

SpaceX's unmanned Dragon cargo ship arrived Wednesday at the International Space Station, packed with food, gear and science experiments for the astronauts living in orbit.

School-grown vegetables increase salad selection

May 14, 2015

If kids grow vegetables, they're more likely to eat them. A new Cornell study published in Acta Paediatrica shows that when garden grown vegetables were slipped into school salads, kids were over four times as likely to take ...

Designing the hanging gardens of Mars

April 26, 2017

NASA is all about solving challenges, and the goal of having a prolonged presence in space, or a colony on Mars or some other world, is full of challenges, including the necessity of growing food. Scientists at Kennedy Advanced ...

Dutch crops grown on 'Mars' soil found safe to eat

June 23, 2016

Dutch scientists said Thursday crops of four vegetables and cereals grown on soil similar to that on Mars have been found safe to eat, amid plans for the first manned mission to the planet.

No room for vegetables? Pot up your plants

March 12, 2018

Many vegetables grow well in containers located on a patio, porch, balcony or windowsill, so don't let lack of yard space keep you from gardening this spring and summer.

Recommended for you

Amazon River pirating water from neighboring Rio Orinoco

August 16, 2018

The Amazon River is slowly stealing a 40,000-square-kilometer (25,000-square-mile) drainage basin from the upper Orinoco River, according to new research suggesting this may not be the first time the world's largest river ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.