October trial set for US kids' climate change lawsuit

April 13, 2018
Emissions spew from the coal fired Brandon Shores Power Plant, on March 9, 2018 in Baltimore, Maryland

A trial date has been set for October 29 in the case of nearly two dozen US youths suing the US government for failing to protect public resources by burning fossil fuels.

The case, Juliana v. United States, will be heard before US District Court Judge Ann Aiken in Eugene, Oregon, said a statement on Thursday from Our Children's Trust, the non-profit group supporting the plaintiffs who range in age from 10 to 20.

The lawsuit was first filed in 2015, during the administration of former president Barack Obama but it goes to trial under President Donald Trump, who withdrew from the global Paris Agreement on climate change and has defended .

The plaintiffs include the granddaughter of renowned climate scientist James Hansen, formerly of NASA.

They argue that the government, "through its affirmative actions in creating a national energy system that causes climate change, has violated their constitutional rights to life, liberty, and property, and has failed to protect essential public trust resources."

According to Julia Olson, executive director of Our Children's Trust, the legal team is planning a series of expert depositions by late summer "so that the court can make the best informed decision in this crucial constitutional case."

The judge set the trial date despite attempts by the Trump administration for extra time to find rebuttal experts.

"By setting a trial date of October 29, 2018 the court clearly recognizes the urgency of the climate crisis," said Phil Gregory, co-lead counsel for the youth plaintiffs.

"On October 29th climate science will finally have its day in court and the plaintiffs will be ready."

The youths say they want science-based action by the US government to stabilize the system and return atmospheric to below 350 parts per million—they are already over 400 ppm—by the year 2100.

To do so, the plaintiffs want the government to cut the use of , which spew greenhouse gases, warm the atmosphere and contribute to rising seas and .

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aksdad
1.8 / 5 (5) Apr 13, 2018
I wonder how a bunch of kids acquired the legal acumen and financial resources to pursue this case? Oh, wait. It's just another stunt by well-funded liberal political action groups exploiting children to further their ridiculous agenda. Same tactic as the recent "spontaneous" (uh-huh, sure) demonstrations by children to eradicate the Second Amendment.

Someone needs to file suit against the people who brainwash and use children for political purposes. Child abuse and exploitation of a minor should be a lot easier to prove than "failing to protect public resources by burning fossil fuels".

Isn't it great that they can tie up courts and waste criminal justice resources to pursue this frivolity, while courts are backlogged with cases of real crimes?
antialias_physorg
4.5 / 5 (8) Apr 13, 2018
despite attempts by the Trump administration for extra time to find rebuttal experts

Seriously? They are worried they can't find climate deniers within the next 6 months?
(Or is it the 'experts' part that make it so difficult?)

Someone needs to file suit against the people who brainwash and use children for political purposes.

Good luck with that. Every religion on the planet will be against you.

Isn't it great that they can tie up courts and waste criminal justice resources to pursue this frivolity

Is it a frivolity if they actually have a case? Up to now you've only griped about the plaintiffs not being older. What does that have to do with the matter of the case? Are young people not allowed the protection of the law?
MR166
1 / 5 (5) Apr 13, 2018
Under Obama a whole racket was set up where groups would sue the federal government and the government would offer little or no defense. This is how they modified the application of existing laws and funded liberal organizations.
marcush
5 / 5 (2) Apr 16, 2018
Sounds like the denialists here are starting to worry. About time.

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