Ice bridge in Argentine glacier collapses, no witnesses

March 13, 2018
A chunk of ice falls from a famous bridge that formed in a glacier at the tip of Argentina

An ice bridge that was part of a glacier at the tip of Argentina has collapsed in the dead of night, thwarting thousands of tourists who had hoped to watch the spectacle.

The natural arch in Los Glaciares National Park in the Patagonia region came crashing down overnight Sunday during a storm while the was closed, park authorities said Monday.

An arch forms regularly in a glacier called Perito Moreno as the from a canal eats away at the ice.

For the first time in 16 years, the bridge fell in 2004 and since then it has come down every four years of so.

"It is always spectacular. The thing is, this time more water accumulated than in the last three or four times," Luciano Bernacchi, director of an ice museum called Glaciarium, told TN television.

The Patagonia glacier is a UNESCO world heritage site.

Explore further: Ice arch collapse caught on film in Patagonia

Related Stories

Ice arch collapse caught on film in Patagonia

March 10, 2016

A fragile arch of ice at the tip of a glacier in southern Argentina spectacularly collapsed into the water Thursday, a natural display that happens just once every several years.

Ice dam collapses at Argentine glacier

March 4, 2012

An ice dam at Argentina's Perito Moreno glacier collapsed early Sunday, creating an impressive spectacle not seen since July 2008, although few tourists were actually awake to experience the moment.

Recommended for you

Paleontologists report world's biggest Tyrannosaurus rex

March 22, 2019

University of Alberta paleontologists have just reported the world's biggest Tyrannosaurus rex and the largest dinosaur skeleton ever found in Canada. The 13-metre-long T. rex, nicknamed "Scotty," lived in prehistoric Saskatchewan ...

NASA instruments image fireball over Bering Sea

March 22, 2019

On Dec. 18, 2018, a large "fireball—the term used for exceptionally bright meteors that are visible over a wide area—exploded about 16 miles (26 kilometers) above the Bering Sea. The explosion unleashed an estimated 173 ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.