Record-setting spacewalk ends with antenna in wrong spot

February 3, 2018 by Marcia Dunn
Recording-setting spacewalk ends with antenna in wrong spot
This Jan. 31, 2018 photo made available by NASA shows cosmonauts Alexander Misurkin, left, and Anton Shkaplerov in their Russian Orlan spacesuits during a fit check inside the International Space Station. On Friday, Feb. 2, 2018, the two removed an old electronics box as part of an antenna upgrade at the ISS, then tossed it overboard as a piece of junk. (NASA via AP)

A record-setting Russian spacewalk ended with a critical antenna in the wrong position Friday outside the International Space Station.

NASA's Mission Control reported that the antenna was still working. Nevertheless, Russian space officials were convening a special team to see whether further action would be necessary. The antenna is used for communications with Russia's Mission Control outside Moscow.

The trouble arose toward the end of the more than 8 hour spacewalk— the longest ever by Russians and the fifth longest overall—after Commander Alexander Misurkin and Anton Shkaplerov successfully replaced an electronics box to upgrade the antenna.

The pair watched in dismay as the antenna got hung up on the Russian side of the complex and could not be extended properly. The antenna—a long boom with a 4-foot dish at the end—had been folded up before the repair work.

Misurkin and Shkaplerov pushed, as flight controllers tried repeatedly, via remote commanding, to rotate the antenna into the right position. Finally, someone shouted in Russian, "It's moving. It's in place."

NASA Mission Control said from Houston that the antenna wound up in a position 180 degrees farther than anticipated.

The spacewalk dragged on so long—lasting 8 hours and 13 minutes—that Misurkin and Shkaplerov ended up surpassing the previous Russian record of 8 hours and 7 minutes, set in 2013. It was supposed to last 6 ½ hours.

"Are you kidding us?" one of them asked when they heard about the record.

NASA still holds the world record, with a spacewalk just shy of nine hours back in 2001.

Misurkin and Shkaplerov also asked whether the antenna was operating "or have we just wasted our time?" The response: It's being evaluated.

It was the second spacewalk in as many weeks. On Jan. 23, two U.S. astronauts went out to give a new hand to the station's big robotic arm. NASA had planned another this week, but bumped it to mid-February because engineers needed extra time to get the mechanical hand working.

After removing the old, obsolete electronics box from the —an original part, launched in 2000—Misurkin shoved it away from the . The bundle tumbled harmlessly away, 250 miles above the North Atlantic.

The 60-pound box—measuring just a couple of feet, or less than a meter—was hurled in a direction that will not intersect with the space station, according to NASA officials.

While the Russians routinely toss old equipment and used towels overboard during spacewalks, NASA prefers to secure no-longer-needed items or, if possible, bring them inside. Except for SpaceX's cargo ships, empty supply capsules are filled with trash and set loose to burn up in the atmosphere. The discarded electronics box will re-enter and burn up, too; Mission Control said it did not know when that will occur.

Misurkin will return to Earth at the end of this month with two NASA crewmates.

The space station is home to two Russians, three Americans and one Japanese.

Explore further: Russian astronauts take spacewalk to upgrade station antenna (Update)

More information: NASA: www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/main/index.html

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flat_earth
1.3 / 5 (14) Feb 03, 2018
Earth is not a spinning globe flying through a vacuum. Astronomy astrophysics is not real science. Water and air clinging to a spinning ball flying through a vacuum can't be demonstrated in the real world. Earth is flat and motionless. Outer space doesn't exist. The sun, moon and stars are lights moving around above us in the firmament 25 miles up in the sky. Our eyes can only see so far. The horizon is the vanishing point. There is no curvature. Water lays flat and is contained by the ice wall 50,000 miles surrounding the world. NASA is fraud fooling people with CGI, photoshop, animation and actors in harnesses green screen special effects.
WWWtimWWW
5 / 5 (12) Feb 03, 2018
Earth is not a spinning globe flying through a vacuum. Astronomy astrophysics is not real science. Water and air clinging to a spinning ball flying through a vacuum can't be demonstrated in the real world. Earth is flat and motionless. Outer space doesn't exist. The sun, moon and stars are lights moving around above us in the firmament 25 miles up in the sky. Our eyes can only see so far. The horizon is the vanishing point. There is no curvature. Water lays flat and is contained by the ice wall 50,000 miles surrounding the world. NASA is fraud fooling people with CGI, photoshop, animation and actors in harnesses green screen special effects.


What would be their reason to be doing this? Why keep a LONG running scam going? Maybe it is really that the earth is round, floating in space, it would be just a lot easier to try to explain that.
Anonym125763
5 / 5 (1) Feb 03, 2018
I guess talking about flat world BS is the best way to ignore asking what recording they set.
AlohaMilton
5 / 5 (6) Feb 03, 2018
dont think that anyone opposed to science actually cares about whatever alternative they propose. It is not a matter of seeking alternate answers but simply not wanting others to have any freedom of thought. flat earther does not believe so much that the earth is flat as they feel they must deceive others to have power. it is those that focus on other human reactions and control of narratives within society. they dont just not care about science, they find it a distraction from focusing on manipulation of social groups. just different kinds of people.
rrwillsj
3.5 / 5 (4) Feb 03, 2018
My suspicion is the Cosmonauts wanted an excuse to go back out again!

It is important to remember that advocates for the Flat Earther cultists are actually agents of the Uranus Conspiracy. Determined to cover up the Indoubtable truth and scruptulously scriptural verity that the Earth is Hollow! Accidentally turned inside out when the Green-Cheese Moon billiard into our world.

Hey! Accidents happen...
peabody3000
5 / 5 (9) Feb 03, 2018
Earth is not a spinning globe flying through a vacuum.


believe however you wish. that is your privilege. but i have to suspect your true beliefs are very different than you claim
Captain Stumpy
4.3 / 5 (6) Feb 03, 2018
@AlohaMilton
flat earther does not believe so much that the earth is flat as they feel they must deceive others to have power. it is those that focus on other human reactions and control of narratives within society. they dont just not care about science, they find it a distraction from focusing on manipulation of social groups
true

but it's more nefarious than at first glance:
not only is this religion 101, but it's straight out of the sociopath's handbook

manipulate, dominate and control
koitsu
5 / 5 (6) Feb 03, 2018
Actually, you're all wrong. I read that the world is supported by four really big elephants standing on the back of a REALLY, REALLY big turtle. True story.
koitsu
5 / 5 (4) Feb 03, 2018
By the way, is flat_earth a Russian troll account to deflect conversation from the actual article? If so, it did its job perfectly, lol
Nik_2213
4.8 / 5 (4) Feb 03, 2018
And that killer question: #FE, what evidence would it take to change your mind ??
someone11235813
5 / 5 (2) Feb 03, 2018
Is that a yellow 'post it' note on Shkaplerov's left arm? Perhaps reminding him of the where the antenna was meant to go.
big_hairy_jimbo
5 / 5 (6) Feb 03, 2018
Don't feed the TROLL people. They don't really believe in FLAT EARTH they just say this shit to stir people up. Just ignore anyone that mentions that subject. They are attention seeking children.
rrwillsj
4.2 / 5 (5) Feb 03, 2018
Well Jimbo, it worked!

And yes, the little anklebiter and his pals are rolling around the floor chortling their heads off while tweeting all their school chums of this joke.

I want revenge!

When they are teens, poke holes in their condoms.

Grandchildren! The perfect revenge on this generation of obstreperous little snotbags.
Mark Thomas
5 / 5 (3) Feb 04, 2018
"While the Russians routinely toss old equipment and used towels overboard during spacewalks, NASA prefers to secure no-longer-needed items or, if possible, bring them inside."

With the amount of debris already in low Earth orbit (LEO), the NASA approach makes more sense to me. Regarding old equipment the Russians push away, it might be better to bring this stuff back to Earth in SpaceX Dragon capsules to see if we can learn anything from how it failed or at least how the part aged before it was replaced.
rrwillsj
4.2 / 5 (5) Feb 05, 2018
MT, I agree with your comment about keeping the orbital debris to a minimum.

However, I disagree with returning the collected trash back down to Earthside.

Considering the expense of getting all that crap into orbit? The possible value of junk retrieval in orbit is much greater than the original prices paid for each item.

A junkyard would be an important resource for you spacenuts. As you said, material degradation research. And I imagine some clever handyman could do a lot of recycling of the refuse.

And all this could be handled by orbital facility such as an expanded or new space station? Or by drones & waldoes controlled from ground stations by private crowdsource volunteers.
Mark Thomas
4 / 5 (4) Feb 05, 2018
A junkyard would be an important resource for you spacenuts.


I prefer "space advocate" to "spacenut," but I see your point.

Perhaps you could make a business case for this. For example, selected metals could probably be separated and used as feed material for some new or upcoming 3D printers.
TheGhostofOtto1923
not rated yet Feb 05, 2018
A junkyard would be an important resource for you spacenuts. As you said, material degradation research. And I imagine some clever handyman could do a lot of recycling of the refuse
Willis wants to waste fuel and effort and money gathering up all the junk flying 10s of 1000s of miles apart, at enormous delta V, so that it can be delivered to some orbital workshop for refurbishment equipped with adequate techs, instruments, tools, and materials... and then sent to elsewhere in orbit at great expense to be used in highly technical and extremely complex situations... rather than just burn it up in the atmosphere which is what the russians and everybody else usually do.

Who gives this guy 5/5s? Is this the fault of willis or of the people who do not think about what he actually posts?
TheGhostofOtto1923
not rated yet Feb 05, 2018
Perhaps you could make a business case for this. For example, selected metals could probably be separated and used
-And marky mark wants to have machine shops, foundaries, smelters, clean rooms, testing and validation facilities, to turn spent filters and broken wrenches into control units and coolant pumps and space suits.

I suppose if you had some appreciation of the immense amount of work in highly specialized and widely dispersed facilities around the globe, and the exacting specs and tolerances that space equipment needs to be fabricated to, you might think otherwise.
Mark Thomas
not rated yet Feb 06, 2018
And marky mark wants to have machine shops, foundaries, smelters, clean rooms, testing and validation facilities, to turn spent filters and broken wrenches into control units and coolant pumps and space suits.


Otto, maybe I was not clear, or maybe you need to work on your reading comprehension. I wrote nothing about all that stuff, I actually wrote, "selected metals could probably be separated and used as feed material for some new or upcoming 3D printers."

If a piece of spent equipment has a few kilograms of separable aluminum, perhaps that could be separated, ground down and used as feed material for a 3D printer like this one.

https://newatlas....g/50654/

Otto, are you saying that 3D printing will never work in space?
LagomorphZero
5 / 5 (1) Feb 06, 2018
"NASA Mission Control said from Houston that the antenna wound up in a position 180 degrees farther than anticipated"

.. lol, they put it on backwards!, hopefully the next one will get a "this arrow towards earth" sign, or asymmetric bolt holes so it only goes in one way.
rrwillsj
3 / 5 (2) Feb 06, 2018
Otto just doesn't want all the tedious, meticulous effort that needs to be done to create an successful (i.e. profitable) space-based industry.

Instead he would continue extravagantly costly launches of repetitious materials into orbit. Because it looks so pretty, when the rockets red glare!

What I'm pondering is why I try to help the old fart out with suggestive ideas for a future he believes in. And, I do not...
TheGhostofOtto1923
not rated yet Feb 06, 2018
maybe i wasnt clear
Marky mark was very clear when he suggested that 3d printing was only one of the many things a business case could be made for...
Perhaps you could make a business case for this. For example, selected metals could probably be separated and used as feed material for some new or upcoming 3D printers
'For example' is what he said.

And he was also very clear in his attempts to deny that he agreed with willises brilliant suggestions for reprocessing junk in space.

Separate aluminum by dragging a spent satellite halfway around the planet, disassembling it, decontaminating it, smelting the bits and pieces, reamalgamating with raw matls from earth, annealing, machining, coating, testing and validating, and assembling along with new parts from earth into a new widget which then has to be sent off on a new trajectory to a new orbit with a custom vehicle.

Oh and jettisoning the unusable remainder of the satellite to burn up in the atmosphere.
TheGhostofOtto1923
not rated yet Feb 06, 2018
they put it on backwards!, hopefully the next one will get a "this arrow towards earth" sign, or asymmetric bolt holes so it only goes in one way
Actually, it was a faulty deployment. Cheap shot wasted.
rrwillsj
1 / 5 (1) Feb 07, 2018
Considering Otto's comment that my idea of collecting orbiting junk would be expensive consuming limited rocket propellant.

As a terrifically imaginative and handsomely generous guy I be, here is a possible solution.

Project Erigoninae using spider-webbing synthesized by orbital automats.

Spitting the buds of webbing in the general direction of orbiting debris. Radiant energy blossoms the web open into large sails. Entangling whatever runs into them. Not just human trash but also normal space flotsam. The small meteorites that almost never survive hitting the atmosphere. Consider the knowledge we could gain from that collection.

Entangled, the momentum of the junk would whip the sail around the collected debris even more. Producing a clump of material worth the cost to retrieve for salvage.

No, no please. Your thanks are unnecessary. Though that thought in your head of putting my name in nomination for a Nobel Prize? With all undue humility I do accept.
TheGhostofOtto1923
not rated yet Feb 07, 2018
Before you dump any more shit here please research 'delta' and 'V'.

And come back in 5 years when youre 18.
rrwillsj
1 / 5 (1) Feb 08, 2018
Sorry Otto, but I do not date older men. No matter how much you beg.
Mark Thomas
1 / 5 (1) Feb 08, 2018
Otto, you like to look for arguments where none exist. I agree delta V could be a huge showstopper, but my focus was on recycling the stuff the Russians simply push away from the ISS, no delta V required. Again, I suggested an attempt be made to develop a business case and that would have to account for the costs of any required delta V. It very well may turn out that if the stuff is not already on the ISS, it is not worth trying to recycle with current technology because of delta V. There might be a trade off between mass/type of materials and delta V required to retrieve them.

All I am really saying is that with new 3D metal printers, it might make sense to make use of what is currently considered junk.
TheGhostofOtto1923
1 / 5 (1) Feb 08, 2018
focus was on recycling the stuff the Russians simply push away from the ISS, no delta V required
I see. So you want a recycling station on the ISS where used sats and boosters from around the globe are brought for dismantling and reprocessing?

Or you just want to waste the time of station personnel dismantling the used gadgets in a special, isolated work/storage module to pull out a few ozs of aluminum that then needs to be decontaminated, ground up, smelted with other materials, processed into usable feed stock, validated and tested, and used to print a component for assembly into equipment using other parts delivered to the ISS, which then has to be validated, tested, and installed?
All I am really saying is that with new 3D metal printers, it might make sense to make use of what is currently considered junk... how much you beg
-From the workshop of dunning and kruger.
it might make sense
No, it obviously does not.

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