Image: Space station transits the moon

December 5, 2017, NASA
Credit: NASA/Joel Kowsky

The International Space Station, with a crew of six onboard, is seen in silhouette as it transits the Moon at roughly five miles per second, Saturday, Dec. 2, 2017, in Manchester Township, York County, Pennsylvania.

Onboard are: NASA astronauts Joe Acaba, Mark Vande Hei, and Randy Bresnik; Russian cosmonauts Alexander Misurkin and Sergey Ryanzansky; and ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli.

Explore further: Image: Randy Bresnik and Mark Vande Hai spacewalk

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