Image: Star wanders too close to a black hole

November 27, 2017, NASA
Credit: NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

This artist's rendering shows the tidal disruption event named ASASSN-14li, where a star wandering too close to a 3-million-solar-mass black hole was torn apart.

The debris gathered into an around the black hole.

Data from NASA's Swift satellite show that the initial formation of the disk was shaped by interactions among incoming and outgoing streams of tidal debris.

Read more: Data suggest black holes swallow stellar debris in bursts—phys.org/news/2017-03-black-ho … -stellar-debris.html

Explore further: Data suggest black holes swallow stellar debris in bursts

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