Invention detects black ice in traffic

November 27, 2017, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland
Credit: Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT)

A new Finnish invention by EEE Innovations Ltd and VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland revolutionizes the way black ice is detected and provides several other improvements in traffic safety as well. The software installed in vehicles can also guide drivers to drive more economically. Software-based, the invention can be installed into a majority of heavy vehicles in particular with no additional equipment.

The allows slippery road conditions to be detected extremely accurately and even in real time and with costs significantly lower than by any other methods currently in use. The first application of this patented technology is offered for heavy traffic use, but the can be applied to private vehicles as well.

"The driving optimization system we have developed is the only one capable of recognizing the driver's input in economical driving, taking also into account factors independent of the driver, such as weather conditions, traffic jams and -related differences," says Jarmo Leino from EEE Innovations Oy, the company that has developed the service.

Data gathered from the vehicles is refined and delivered forward. The driver guidance system can be installed as a part of software already existing in the vehicles. It can also be installed as an independent entity, containing both the driving optimization and slipperiness detection components.

"Our goal is to make all heavy vehicles moving slipperiness sensors and to refine the gathered data into valuable information, to benefit all traffic users and other parties," Jarmo Leino says.

The inventions originate from VTT heavy research projects, and they have been piloted in one EU-level project as well as in Finland.

"The pilot project indicates that with the system, savings up to 20% in fuel consumption can be reached, in addition to improved road safety," says Principal Scientist Raine Hautala of VTT.

Explore further: Data exchange between vehicles and the road network increases traffic safety

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