SpaceX racks up another rocket launch, its 16th this year

October 30, 2017 by Marcia Dunn
SpaceX racks up another rocket launch, its 16th this year
A Falcon 9 SpaceX rocket carrying a Koreasat 5A communications satellite lifts off from at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Monday, Oct. 30, 2017. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

SpaceX has racked up another rocket launch, its 16th this year.

That's double last year's count, and 2017 still has two months remaining.

The unmanned Falcon rocket blasted off Monday afternoon from Florida's Kennedy Space Center, hoisting a communications satellite for the South Korean company KT SAT. This newest Koreasat will replace a failed satellite launched in 2006, and serve both Asia and the Middle East.

Once separated, the 15-story first-stage booster flew to a in the Atlantic and landed upright. The TV link of the touchdown was lost. But SpaceX confirmed success despite the choppy seas and some flames shooting from the landed booster. The fire went out.

"A little toasty, but stage one is certainly still intact," said the launch commentator from company headquarters in Hawthorne, California.

SpaceX expects to reuse the booster to save time and money. Other rocket makers ditch the boosters at sea following orbital missions.

The company has launched almost every month this year—a personal record—flying Falcons from both U.S. coasts.

A Falcon 9 SpaceX rocket carrying a Koreasat 5A communications satellite lifts off at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Monday, Oct. 30, 2017. (AP Photo/John Raoux)
SpaceX racks up another rocket launch, its 16th this year
A Falcon 9 SpaceX rocket carrying a Koreasat 5A communications satellite lifts off from pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Monday, Oct. 30, 2017. (AP Photo/John Raoux)

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unrealone1
not rated yet Oct 31, 2017
Just amazing. 16th this year, wow.

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