Hurricane topples 'Moon Tree' that was on Apollo mission

Winds from Hurricane Irma have toppled a tiny tree that orbited the moon and later grew at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida.

Florida Today reports the sycamore tree, also known as a "Moon Tree," was toppled by .

In 1971, hundreds of tree seeds were carried into space by Apollo 14 astronaut Stuart Roosa. When the Apollo 14 returned to Earth, a mishap caused them to mix. They were deemed unusable for experiments, but were grown anyway.

A NASA report says hundreds of the trees were planted across the country to celebrate the nation's 200th birthday, though all their locations weren't properly documented.

The visitor complex says the spirit of the Moon Tree lives on as the complex continues to share the NASA story of space exploration.


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Sep 22, 2017
It isn't surprising it toppled over. Sycamore trees are garbage trees. They have weak wood that can't be used for burning because of the composition of the wood, they can't be used for building anything because the wood is so weak and their root systems are very disruptive to sidewalks, seage systems, basement walls, etc. they really have no use other than to grow and emit oxygen. However, they are also easily knocked over by winds. I say good riddance. I can't think of anything good to say about Sycamores. Just because the seed from which it grew orbited the moon doesn't make any more of a valuable tree.

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