How well electron transport works in furfural biogas

September 13, 2017

Furfural is a promising candidate in the quest for alternative biofuels. The combustion industries are very interested in what could become a potential new type of fuel derived from atmospheric-plasma treatment of biomass. But before the gas can be considered for use on a large scale, it is essential to understand its energy characteristics.

Now, a Spanish team has published its findings on the gas's energy efficiency in EPJ D. Ana Lozano from the Institute of Fundamental Physics in Madrid, Spain, and colleagues studied an entering a cell filled with furfural gas molecules to study its scattering characteristics, providing the first accurate experimental evaluation of the effectiveness of the interaction between electron and gas particles—via electron scattering cross-section measurements— for selected electron beam impact energies.

The authors applied a magnetic field along the direction of the electron beam entering a cell filled with furfural gas. They observed that the magnetic field converts any potential deflection due to scattering between the electrons and furfural gas molecules into an in the forward direction of the .

Further, the team used a device called a retarding analyser to effectively discriminate between scattered and unscattered electrons, which allowed them to accurately measure the energy of transmitted electrons as a function of the furfural gas pressure in the scattering chamber. They then used these experimental results as input parameters to create a simulation of the transport of 10 million electrons with an initial energy of 10 eV through gaseous furfural.

This led to the establishment of a benchmark evaluation of the total low-energy electron scattering cross-sections from furfural and loss estimates for selected energies (7, 10 and 20 eV).

Explore further: Improved model of energy highway along protein strands

More information: Ana I. Lozano et al, Low energy electron transport in furfural, The European Physical Journal D (2017). DOI: 10.1140/epjd/e2017-80326-0

Related Stories

Improved model of energy highway along protein strands

September 13, 2017

Ever heard of polarons? They are a kind of quasi-particle resulting from electrons self-trapping in a vibrating crystal lattice. Polarons can be harnessed to transport energy under certain conditions related to the relative ...

Electron scavenging to mimic radiation damage

June 30, 2016

High energy radiation affects biological tissues, leading to short-term reactions. These generate, as a secondary product, electrons with low energy, referred to as LEEs, which are ultimately involved in radiation damage. ...

New discovery opens for 3-D measurements of magnetism

June 9, 2017

A team of researchers from Uppsala University, China and Germany have substantially extended the possibilities of an experimental technique called EMCD, that is used for measuring magnetism in materials. The results were ...

Turmoil in sluggish electrons' existence

May 22, 2017

An international team of physicists has monitored the scattering behavior of electrons in a non-conducting material in real-time. Their insights could be beneficial for radiotherapy.

Recommended for you

Quantum data takes a ride on sound waves

September 22, 2017

Yale scientists have created a simple-to-produce device that uses sound waves to store quantum information and convert it from one form to another, all inside a single, integrated chip.

A way to measure and control phonons

September 22, 2017

(Phys.org)—A team of researchers with the University of Vienna in Austria and Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands has developed a technique using photons for controlling and measuring phonons. In their paper ...

Gravitational waves may oscillate, just like neutrinos

September 21, 2017

(Phys.org)—Using data from the first-ever gravitational waves detected last year, along with a theoretical analysis, physicists have shown that gravitational waves may oscillate between two different forms called "g" and ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.