VR cricket game uses motion capture technology for full immersive experience

August 10, 2017
Cricket fans can now try out their batting skills with a virtual reality cricket game. Credit: Stickee Studios

With the cricket season in full swing, cricket fans can try out their batting skills at home with a virtual reality game developed by Stickee in collaboration with researchers at the University of Bath.

Researchers at the University's Centre for the Analysis of Motion, Entertainment Research and Applications (CAMERA), used the latest motion capture technology to record movements of actors playing cricket in a studio. These data were then used to animate fielders, bowlers and umpires in the game to make it more lifelike.

The researchers aim to use these data to feed into other applications in entertainment to create a more for gamers. The game, called Balls! Virtual Reality Cricket, uses the HTC Vive headset and is available to download on the Steam games store.

Gamers can play against their friends, and adjust the difficulty level by selecting different bowler types and speeds. Head of Studio at CAMERA, Martin Parsons, said, "Working with commercial partners from the games industry gives us valuable experience with clients to better understand their needs and work outside the 'research bubble'."

Gamers wanting to try out this game can find more information at: http://virtualrealitycricket.club/

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Researchers used motion capture data to animate the bowler, fielders and umpire. Credit: CAMERA, University of Bath

Screen shot of game. Credit: Stickee Studios

Explore further: Intel ventures into virtual reality with headset and new studio

More information: www.camera.ac.uk/

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