Egypt archaeologists uncover tombs dating back to Roman era

Egypt's Antiquities Ministry says that archaeologists have uncovered five tombs from the Roman era, dating back to more than 2,000 years.

Thursday's statement says the discovery was made in a western desert area known as Beir al-Shagala near the Dakhla oasis, southwest of Cairo

The archaeological mission uncovered a range of artefacts, including the remains of a funerary mask, a set of pottery vessels, a clay incenses burner, a small sandstone sphinx and two ostraca, or ink-in-clay pottery shards.

One ostracon bears hieroglyphic texts while the other is scripted in hieratic, a cursive writing system used during pharaonic times.

The ministry says that the , including a pyramid-shaped one and another with a domed ceiling, were built in mud-brick and contain several burial chambers.


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Egypt archaeologists discover tombs dating back 2,000 years

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Citation: Egypt archaeologists uncover tombs dating back to Roman era (2017, August 24) retrieved 12 November 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-08-egypt-archaeologists-uncover-tombs-dating.html
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