Satellite shows Tropical Storm Greg losing shape

July 24, 2017, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured this infrared image of Tropical Storm Greg on July 24 at 8 a.m. EDT (1200 UTC). Greg is located over 1,500 miles east of Hawaii. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project

Tropical Storm Greg appears to be less-rounded and more elongated on satellite imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite. Greg is still over 1,500 miles east of Hawaii.

NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an of Tropical Storm Greg on July 24 at 8 a.m. EDT (1200 UTC). The image revealed a less-rounded tropical cyclone. The National Hurricane Center noted the reason for the change in shape: "Greg's convective structure is gradually deteriorating, likely due to very dry air in the surrounding atmosphere."

NOAA manages the GOES series of satellites, and NASA uses the data to create images and animations. The image was created by the NASA/NOAA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC), the center of Tropical Storm Greg was located near 14.6 degrees north latitude and 133.2 degrees west longitude. That's about 1,515 miles (2,440 km) east of South Point Hawaii. Greg was moving toward the west near 12 mph (19 kph). A west-northwestward or northwestward motion at a slower forward speed is expected during the next couple of days.

Maximum sustained winds are near 45 mph (75 kph) with higher gusts. Weakening is forecast during the next 48 hours. Greg will likely be a by about July 26 and then a remnant low by July 27.

Explore further: Satellite sees Tropical Storm Greg after 'eating' a depression

Related Stories

NASA's Terra satellite watching Tropical Storm Greg

July 19, 2017

NASA Terra satellite provided a clear view of Tropical Storm Greg, located off the southwestern coast of Mexico. Greg is one of three tropical cyclones in the Eastern Pacific Ocean and is the closest to land.

GOES Satellite sees Tropical Depression 09E form

July 21, 2017

The Eastern Pacific Ocean has been recently generating a lot of tropical cyclones. Tropical Depression 09E just formed off the southern coast of Mexico and was captured in imagery from NOAA's GOES-East satellite.

NASA imagery shows disorganized Tropical Depression 8E

July 20, 2017

Infrared imagery from NASA's Aqua satellite revealed a lack of organized circulation in Tropical Depression 8E. The storm is sandwiched between Tropical Storm Fernanda to the west and Tropical Storm Greg to the east.

Satellite shows a weaker Hurricane Fernanda

July 19, 2017

Hurricane Fernanda appears to be weakening on infrared satellite imagery. NOAA's GOES-West satellite imagery on July 19 showed a more disorganized hurricane nearing the Central Pacific Ocean.

Recommended for you

Propping up glaciers to avoid cataclysmic sea level rise

September 20, 2018

As global warming outpaces efforts to tame it, scientists have proposed building massive underwater structures to prevent an Antarctic glacier the size of Britain from sliding into the sea and lifting the world's oceans by ...

NASA balloon mission captures electric blue clouds

September 20, 2018

On the cusp of our atmosphere live a thin group of seasonal electric blue clouds. Forming 50 miles above the poles in summer, these clouds are known as noctilucent clouds or polar mesospheric clouds—PMCs. A recent NASA ...

Study tracks Hurricane Harvey stormwater with GPS

September 20, 2018

Hurricane Harvey dumped more than 5 feet (1.5 meters) of water on southeast Texas in late August 2017, making it the wettest recorded hurricane in U.S. history. But after the storm passed, where did all that water go?

Unprecedented ice loss in Russian ice cap

September 19, 2018

In the last few years, the Vavilov Ice Cap in the Russian High Arctic has dramatically accelerated, sliding as much as 82 feet a day in 2015, according to a new multi-national, multi-institute study led by CIRES Fellow Mike ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.