Video: The chemistry of olive oil

June 20, 2017, American Chemical Society
Credit: The American Chemical Society

Whether you sop it up with bread or use it to boost your cooking, olive oil is awesome.

But a lot of chemistry goes on in that bottle that can make or break a product. Extra virgin is the most expensive (and most delicious) variety, in part thanks to its low acidity. And those peppery notes are thanks to antioxidants that contribute to olive oil's healthy reputation.

Check out the latest Reactions video for more olive oil chemistry, including how to keep yours fresh and how to best use it to give your food a flavor boost:

Explore further: Video: Chemistry life hacks: Food edition

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