Physicists predict supercurrent driven by potential information transfer

supercurrents
Illustration of the proposed set-up designed to exhibit a superconducting current driven by potential information transfer. Credit: Huang and Nazarov. ©2017 American Physical Society

(Phys.org)—Physicists have theoretically shown that a superconducting current of electrons can be induced to flow by a new kind of transport mechanism: the potential flow of information. This unusual phenomenon is predicted to exist in chiral channels—channels in which electrons are usually restricted to flowing in one direction only—but has never been theoretically demonstrated before now.

The physicists, Xiao-Li Huang and Yuli V. Nazarov at the Delft University of Technology in The Netherlands, have published a paper on the supercurrent induced by potential in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.

As the scientists explain, a transport mechanism for electrons that is based on information transfer is unprecedented and has so far never been observed. Further, chiral channels are thought to be incapable of carrying a superconducting current (one with little to no resistance) at all. So it's quite surprising that a supercurrent can be induced in a chiral channel in the first place, and especially by such an exotic mechanism.

The scientists explained that, by definition, the in a chiral can only move in one direction. To induce supercurrent, an information transfer in the direction opposite to this direction is required. However, the supercurrent, as it's not the usual electric current, can flow in either direction, depending on the phases on the superconducting leads in the proposed set-up.

The physicists also predict that the supercurrent should persist in the ground state, where, by definition, no actual information transfer can take place. The reason why this is possible is because it's not an actual information flow, but rather the potential for such a flow to occur, that drives the supercurrent.

The physicists hope that this intriguing relation between superconductivity and potential information transfer can lead to some novel capabilities. For example, as they write in their paper, supercurrent might be used to "probe the potential for without actually transferring the information." The physicists expect that it should be possible to experimentally observe the effect in graphene-based chiral channels, and they hope to further investigate this possibility in the future.


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More information: Xiao-Li Huang and Yuli V. Nazarov. "Supercurrents in Unidirectional Channels Originate from Information Transfer in the Opposite Direction: A Theoretical Prediction." Physical Review Letters. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.118.177001
Journal information: Physical Review Letters

© 2017 Phys.org

Citation: Physicists predict supercurrent driven by potential information transfer (2017, May 10) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-05-physicists-supercurrent-driven-potential.html
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May 10, 2017
previously predicted now theoretically demonstarted

May 10, 2017
The physicists hope that this intriguing relation between superconductivity and potential information transfer can lead to some novel capabilities. For example, as they write in their paper, supercurrent might be used to "probe the potential for information transfer without actually transferring the information.

Is this as big as I think it is? I can't really put my finger on it but this *sounds* like something revolutionary.

May 10, 2017
proteins do it all the time

May 10, 2017
The physicists hope that this intriguing relation between superconductivity and potential information transfer can lead to some novel capabilities. For example, as they write in their paper, supercurrent might be used to "probe the potential for information transfer without actually transferring the information.

Is this as big as I think it is? I can't really put my finger on it but this *sounds* like something revolutionary.


proteins do it all the time


So what are we talking about? Hawking radiation manipulating our dna or something?

May 11, 2017
This paper may shed some light on this, but admittedly I haven't had a chance to fully read/comprehend it yet.
http://vixra.org/...69v1.pdf
One can sure win at quantum keyword bingo with this one. (Whiff of BS?) Maybe someone Smarter Than I (tm) can make sense of it.

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