Study reveals how ulcer-inducing bacteria survive in the stomach

April 4, 2017 by David Stacey, University of Western Australia
Study reveals how ulcer-inducing bacteria survive in the stomach
Credit: University of Western Australia

Scientists at The University of Western Australia, in collaboration with researchers at Imperial College London and Perth-based biotech Ondek Pty Ltd, have revealed new insights into the structure of an important biomolecule in Helicobacter pylori, the bacterium that causes stomach ulcers.

H. pylori, discovered by UWA Professor Barry Marshall and Emeritus Professor Robin Warren, infects the human stomach and causes ulcers. Professor Marshall and Dr Warren were awarded the 2005 Nobel Prize for Medicine and Physiology for their discovery.

The latest UWA-led research, recently published in PLOS Pathogens, reveals the and enzymes responsible for the synthesis of the lipopolysaccharide. This biomolecule covers the entire surface of the like a shield and has unique properties compared to most other bacteria in that the molecule promotes lifelong infection by helping the bacterium evade the host's natural immune system.

"Even though this information has been known for some time, the precise structure and the enzymes that the bacterium uses to build it have not been fully understood," Professor Marshall said.

"Now that the enzymes involved in the synthesis have been found, opportunities in developing compounds that prevent the molecule from being formed could lead to new strategies to treat H. pylori infections."

Co-author and chemical biologist Associate Professor Keith Stubbs, from UWA's School of Molecular Sciences, said the research team was ideally placed to explore new treatment options.

"The team is now investigating which enzymes are the best targets and new compounds are being developed as potential therapeutics," Associate Professor Stubbs said.

"Now we know the structure, we're looking at how the biomolecule assists the bacterium in surviving in the stomach."

Explore further: New point of attack against stomach bacterium Helicobacter pylori

More information: Hong Li et al. The redefinition of Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide O-antigen and core-oligosaccharide domains, PLOS Pathogens (2017). DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1006280

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