Groups sue to stop US use of cyanide predator killing traps

Environmental and animal-welfare groups have filed a lawsuit claiming the U.S. government is violating the Endangered Species Act by allowing the use of two predator-killing poisons.

The filed Tuesday in federal court in Montana by the Center for Biological Diversity and other groups seeks an immediate ban of the poisons where they could harm federally protected species including .

One device placed in the ground sprays cyanide when triggered by animals.

An Idaho boy was injured last month when he checked one out with his dog on federally-owned land. The dog died.

The other poison targeted in the lawsuit is a pesticide called Compound 1080 placed in collars worn by livestock and ingested by attacking predators.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is named in the lawsuit.


Explore further

Federal agency defends decision not to protect Montana fish

© 2017 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

Citation: Groups sue to stop US use of cyanide predator killing traps (2017, April 4) retrieved 15 October 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-04-groups-sue-cyanide-predator.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
7 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Apr 04, 2017
Quote article "The other poison targeted in the lawsuit is a pesticide called Compound 1080 placed in collars worn by livestock and ingested by attacking predators."

Sounds fair to me. But a semi lethal shock collar would perhaps do the trick. Perhaps also with dye to mark the predator.
In this day and age it could even be programed to turn off a hour after the animal's death. So scavengers can't set it off..

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more