Team puts dark matter on the map

March 1, 2017
A 3-D visualization of reconstructed dark matter clump distributions in a distant galaxy cluster, obtained from the Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Fields data. The unseen matter in this map is comprised of a smooth heap of dark matter on which clumps form. Credit: Yale University

A Yale-led team has produced one of the highest-resolution maps of dark matter ever created, offering a detailed case for the existence of cold dark matter—sluggish particles that comprise the bulk of matter in the universe.

The dark matter map is derived from Hubble Space Telescope Frontier Fields data of a trio of galaxy clusters that act as cosmic magnifying glasses to peer into older, more distant parts of the , a phenomenon known as .

Yale astrophysicist Priyamvada Natarajan led an international team of researchers that analyzed the Hubble images. "With the data of these three lensing clusters we have successfully mapped the granularity of dark matter within the clusters in exquisite detail," Natarajan said. "We have mapped all of the clumps of dark matter that the data permit us to detect, and have produced the most detailed topological map of the dark matter landscape to date."

Scientists believe dark matter—theorized, unseen particles that neither reflect nor absorb light, but are able to exert gravity—may comprise 80% of the matter in the universe. Dark matter may explain the very nature of how galaxies form and how the universe is structured. Experiments at Yale and elsewhere are attempting to identify the ; the leading candidates include axions and neutralinos.

"While we now have a precise cosmic inventory for the amount of dark matter and how it is distributed in the universe, the particle itself remains elusive," Natarajan said.

Dark matter particles are thought to provide the unseen mass that is responsible for gravitational lensing, by bending light from distant galaxies. This light bending produces systematic distortions in the shapes of galaxies viewed through the lens. Natarajan's group decoded the distortions to create the new dark matter map.

Significantly, the map closely matches computer simulations of dark matter theoretically predicted by the model; cold dark matter moves slowly compared to the speed of light, while hot dark matter moves faster. This agreement with the standard model is notable given that all of the evidence for thus far is indirect, said the researchers.

The high-resolution simulations used in the study, known as the Illustris suite, mimic structure formation in the universe in the context of current accepted theory. A study detailing the findings appeared Feb. 28 in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

Explore further: 3 knowns and 3 unknowns about dark matter

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28 comments

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rogerdallas
2 / 5 (2) Mar 01, 2017
I look at this map and I think, if we assume that modified gravity accounts for supposed dark matter effects, then the map must represent gravitational gradients. If we make that assumption, then do the gradients mapped define parameters for a modified gravity theory?
entrance
3 / 5 (6) Mar 01, 2017
This image tells us abolutely nothing because there is no reference to the galaxy. This image is just waste of time. :( We would need a 3D-animation, something like https://www.youtu...0GQo3P0c
dogbert
2.7 / 5 (12) Mar 01, 2017
Some people really, really want dark matter to exist.
A distorted plane generated by a computer program is not evidence of anything except the computer.
Benni
1.9 / 5 (14) Mar 01, 2017
"We have mapped all of the clumps of dark matter that the data permit us to detect, and have produced the most detailed topological map of the dark matter landscape to date." Scientists believe dark matter—theorized, unseen particles that neither reflect nor absorb light, but are able to exert gravity—may comprise 80% of the matter in the universe."

The ultimate insult to the thinking person's intelligence...........creating a map for something only "theorized" (their words) to exist.

Great work, mapping a theory.....if I'd have come here doing the same thing can you just imagine all jeering, hoots, and howls that would come down? Wait a minute, they do that now don't they, just ask the DM & BH Enthusiasts to prove their pseudo-science based on anything found in Special & General Relativity & they go off the deep end, they think Einstein is the nutjob.

RNP
4.1 / 5 (14) Mar 01, 2017
@Benni
....creating a map for something only "theorized" (their words) to exist.

Great work, mapping a theory.....


You have not understood the paper (which can be found here: https://arxiv.org...4348.pdf ). The map is based on OBSERVATIONS of weak gravitational lensing around the clusters. They then COMPARE their results to theory finding good (but not complete) agreement.
brendafoley2309
1 / 5 (5) Mar 01, 2017
There is evidence of the superfluid dark matter every time a double slit experiment is performed, it's what waves.
Benni
1.4 / 5 (11) Mar 01, 2017
....creating a map for something only "theorized" (their words) to exist.

Great work, mapping a theory.....


You have not understood the paper (which can be found here: https://arxiv.org...4348.pdf ). The map is based on OBSERVATIONS of weak gravitational lensing around the clusters. They then COMPARE their results to theory finding good (but not complete) agreement.


Nope, I read it, they stated they created a map. A map is a map, the only thing they forgot to figure out was the concept of mapping a "theory". Hey, you're a good Journalist RNP.......you should offer to rewrite this for them.........oh, that's right, that's what you're trying to do here, cover up the deficiencies in the storyline of their narratives.
RNP
4.7 / 5 (12) Mar 01, 2017
@Benni
What are you talking about? Of course they created a map! Nobody said that they did not. But, it was a map based on OBSERVATIONS, so the rest of your post is pure nonsense.
Benni
1.9 / 5 (9) Mar 01, 2017
@Benni
What are you talking about? Of course they created a map! Nobody said that they did not. But, it was a map based on OBSERVATIONS, so the rest of your post is pure nonsense.


"With the data of these three lensing clusters we have successfully mapped the granularity of dark matter


The "pure nonsense" was that the OBSERVATION was that of GRAVITATIONAL LENSING, not DM. Yeah, Rguy, more INFERRED GRAVITY pseudo-science.

I guess you still don't know gravitational lensing goes on all over the Universe without the need for some mysterious unsourced gravitational assistance, that's why creating a map of something that can't be seen "is pure nonsense".
peter_ruhe
1 / 5 (8) Mar 01, 2017
Dark matter = shrunken hydrogen atoms (a.k.a. hydrinos). They can be created and analyzed in terrestrial laboratories. Ignore the Wikipedia article; it is controlled by pathological skeptics or biased orthodoxy.
jonesdave
3.9 / 5 (15) Mar 01, 2017
Strewth. The idiots are out to play here, eh? Where is the idiot Benni's explanation for SgrA*? Still f***ing waiting. Where is the picture of an electron? Still f***ing waiting. Is Benni just a complete tool? Please, stay tuned for further episodes of "Benni is a complete tool." Eventually the tool will come up with something to back up his scientifically illiterate nonsense. Won't he?
Nah, probably not. Tool.
Whydening Gyre
3.5 / 5 (4) Mar 01, 2017
Dark matter = shrunken hydrogen atoms (a.k.a. hydrinos). They can be created and analyzed in terrestrial laboratories. Ignore the Wikipedia article; it is controlled by pathological skeptics or biased orthodoxy.

it's hydrogen, but they are not shrunken. they are just not absorbing any photons at 10,2Ev. That's because the farther they are away from a 10.2Ev light source, the fewer of them that get hit by it. Not to mention, 10.2 EV is only 1 of huge number of transition levels emitted by any natural light source. And the majority of those are being absorbed and re-emitted by other hydrogen in between. We see it more outside of galaxies
It's kinda like trying to hit a bullseye on a dart board in a Chicago bar from the Moon (maybe even Mars)...
Pretty f**kin' tuff...
There's a LOT of non emitting Hydrogen out there....
Benni
1 / 5 (6) Mar 01, 2017
Strewth. The idiots are out to play here, eh?
.........Yep, you're back.....it wasn't a surprise to see more of your foul mouthed filth come pouring from across cyberspace.

Hey, Jonesy, I didn't see anything scientifically literate in your above post.........Maybe give it another try? By the way, are you an asstro-physicist.
Whydening Gyre
4.3 / 5 (6) Mar 01, 2017
@Benni
What are you talking about? Of course they created a map! Nobody said that they did not. But, it was a map based on OBSERVATIONS, so the rest of your post is pure nonsense.


"With the data of these three lensing clusters we have successfully mapped the granularity of dark matter


The "pure nonsense" was that the OBSERVATION was that of GRAVITATIONAL LENSING, not DM. Yeah, Rguy, more INFERRED GRAVITY pseudo-science.

I guess you still don't know gravitational lensing goes on all over the Universe without the need for some mysterious unsourced gravitational assistance, that's why creating a map of something that can't be seen "is pure nonsense".

It seems fairly rational to map what we can't see, via the varying degrees of what we CAN...
arcmetal
2.8 / 5 (8) Mar 01, 2017
I have "observed" an apple falling from a tree, and so I can infer that its an invisible Troll that reached up from the Earth and grabbed and pulled the apple to the ground. I can't see or detect in any way this invisible Troll's arm, but I can infer its there by making an "observation" of the apple falling to the ground. I dare anyone to disprove that my invisible Troll arm, that can't be detected, does not exist. I know it exists because I have made many "observations" of apples falling to the ground.
Da Schneib
4.2 / 5 (5) Mar 02, 2017
Hey @RNP, those maps look sort of clumpy to me. Can you get that sort of clumpiness from MOND? Some of the other pictures I saw in that paper look like there're clumps of dark matter that don't seem to be associated with galaxies. I'm having trouble reconciling that with MOND; but it makes a lot of sense with CDM. What's your opinion?
FineStructureConstant
4.3 / 5 (8) Mar 02, 2017
@am - Quite apart from the fact that each of the apple trees in my garden have their own personal apple fairies,
I dare anyone to disprove that my invisible Troll arm, that can't be detected, does not exist.
...The onus is on you to prove that he exists. And
I know it exists because I have made many "observations" of apples falling to the ground.
Rubbish - you have _seen_ apples falling to the ground. Observations involve taking accurate measurements of phenomena - you've measured nothing, except perhaps your own ineptitude. And yes, I do know you're (at least half) joking...
RNP
4.6 / 5 (9) Mar 02, 2017
@Da Schneib
Hey @RNP, those maps look sort of clumpy to me. Can you get that sort of clumpiness from MOND? Some of the other pictures I saw in that paper look like there're clumps of dark matter that don't seem to be associated with galaxies. I'm having trouble reconciling that with MOND; but it makes a lot of sense with CDM. What's your opinion?


If you mean the paper referred to in the article above, then I think you will find that all the peaks are associated with galaxies. Section 3. (DERIVING SUBSTRUCTURE FROM CLUSTER LENSING DATA) of the paper states ". The small scale subhaloes in our conception of the cluster are associated with the locations of bright, early-type cluster galaxies under the explicit assumption that light traces mass". I therefore do not think there is any way to use these data to distinguish between DM and MOND.
Benni
1 / 5 (7) Mar 02, 2017
I think you will find that all the peaks are associated with galaxies.
Read the article:
The unseen matter in this map is comprised of a smooth heap of dark matter on which clumps form. Credit: Yale University


Schneibo, knock it off with the attempted deviations. Why would you ask a Journalist, like RNP, such a trivial question when it is already explained within the text of the article?

I gather you think Journalists, like RNP, can write up the cosmic fairy dust narrative better than the team who concocted a DM map that is about nothing less than INFERRED GRAVITY.

RNP
4.7 / 5 (12) Mar 02, 2017
@Benni
Typically, you would rather believe your OWN interpretation of a VAGUELY written figure caption, penned by one of the JOURNALISTS that you so despise, rather than believe what the scientist that wrote the paper actually say.
Benni
1.6 / 5 (7) Mar 02, 2017
you would rather believe your OWN interpretation of a VAGUELY written figure caption


Hey. Mr Journalist, I don't have an "interpretation", but "interpretation" is how the pseudo-science of DM INFERRED GRAVITY is advanced.

Somebody who has never studied the Field Equations in General Relativity looks through a telescope, sees gravitational lensing, then concludes it's because 80-95% of the Universe is MISSING. Talk about a leap into an abyss of the culture of funny farm fantasies.

Anyone who has studied Einstein's General Relativity knows why Gravitational Lensing occurs EVERYWHERE in the Universe, and it has nothing to do with with some cosmic fairy dust idea that was concocted 20 years after Einstein published GR & 30 years after he published Special Relativty.

Amazing isn't it, how Einstein could have so perfectly calculated gravitation lensing within 0.02% of error without the need to account for gravity from an unobservable source.
arcmetal
1 / 5 (1) Mar 02, 2017
@FineStructureConstant
@am - Quite apart from the fact that each of the apple trees in my garden have their own personal apple fairies,
I dare anyone to disprove that my invisible Troll arm, that can't be detected, does not exist.
...The onus is on you to prove that he exists. And
I know it exists because I have made many "observations" of apples falling to the ground.
Rubbish - you have _seen_ apples falling to the ground. Observations involve taking accurate measurements of phenomena - you've measured nothing, except perhaps your own ineptitude. And yes, I do know you're (at least half) joking...


Very good. As you can guess these are the types of comments I would hope to entice. So, if you can kindly direct them to those proposing that dark matter or dark energy are real, it would be appreciated.
Captain Stumpy
5 / 5 (6) Mar 02, 2017
Dark matter = shrunken hydrogen atoms (a.k.a. hydrinos). They can be created and analyzed in terrestrial laboratories
@peter_ruhe
please show validation from a secondary source not related to mills that proves hydrino's exist

Da Schneib
4.2 / 5 (5) Mar 02, 2017
Thanks, @RNP.
entrance
not rated yet Mar 03, 2017
I would like to have https://arxiv.org...4348.pdf in german. It's too difficult to me to read it in english, but maybe i would understand some things in german.
Captain Stumpy
5 / 5 (3) Mar 03, 2017
I would like to have https://arxiv.org...4348.pdf )

contacting the relevant department at Wurzburg may allow you to get a copy e-mailed to you from the school, depending

talk to the astrophysics and astronomy dept - they may have it in german or have the ability to translate with software for you (as they likely already have the paper)
Captain Stumpy
5 / 5 (4) Mar 03, 2017
I would like to have https://arxiv.org...4348.pdf )


contacting the relevant department at Wurzburg may allow you to get a copy e-mailed to you from the school, depending on availablilty
https://www.uni-w...culties/

talk to the astrophysics and astronomy dept - they may have it in german or have the ability to translate with software for you (as they likely already have the paper)
iowapiper
5 / 5 (4) Mar 04, 2017
Dark matter = shrunken hydrogen atoms (a.k.a. hydrinos). They can be created and analyzed in terrestrial laboratories. Ignore the Wikipedia article; it is controlled by pathological skeptics or biased orthodoxy.


How about Blacklight's own press release: "BlackLight has produced millions of watts of power in a volume that is one ten thousandths of a liter corresponding to a power density of over an astonishing 10 billion watts per liter."

If they are so right, how come no university, or researcher, or government entity that has looked at their cell can corroborate their claims? (not even remotely close)

There is no conspiracy against Randall Mills - it has been repeatedly debunked by those with knowledge and ability.

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