Video: Tracking data and shark behaviour

Video: Tracking data and shark behaviour

Animals often share space as they move through their environment. Capturing these aggregations and co-occurrence events has proven extremely difficult in elusive, wide-ranging animals.

A recent paper published in Journal of the Royal Society Interface presents a novel approach to inferring social networks from acoustic tracking data of sharks.

The authors demonstrate the first evidence of long-term, spatially-extensive social processes in wild sharks, showing that some individuals act as leaders. Interestingly, these leaders are female sharks, revealing a new insight into the of these animals. We spoke to lead author Dr David Jacoby about the research.

Credit: The Royal Society

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More information: David M. P. Jacoby et al. Inferring animal social networks and leadership: applications for passive monitoring arrays, Journal of The Royal Society Interface (2016). DOI: 10.1098/rsif.2016.0676
Provided by The Royal Society
Citation: Video: Tracking data and shark behaviour (2017, January 13) retrieved 22 April 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-01-video-tracking-shark-behaviour.html
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