Where to sell your unwanted stuff online and earn extra cash

December 28, 2016 by Joseph Pisani
This Dec. 22, 2009, file photo shows a gift card kiosk in New York. If you know you won't be using a gift card, you can sell them at a number of sites, including CardCash, Cardpool and Giftcard Zen. How much money you get depends on a number of factors, including how likely someone else will want to buy it from the gift card seller. You can also trying selling it on your own through eBay. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

If you're cleaning out your closets for the new year, or need some spare cash after the holidays, your old stuff can help fill up your wallet.

A number of websites and apps make it easier to sell used smartphones, furniture and clothes. Here's where to go to sell your unwanted stuff and earn some extra bucks:

GADGETS

If you got the latest tablet or smartphone during the holidays, don't let the old ones go to the forgotten junk drawer. Gazelle and NextWorth will buy your unwanted electronics depending on its condition. Recently, Gazelle was offering $215 for an iPhone 6s in good condition on Verizon's cellphone network.

Other options include Apple, which will pay you in Apple Store gift cards for some products. And retailers Target and Best Buy will take your electronics online or at some of its stores in exchange for gift cards. You can also try selling unwanted electronics on eBay, which may charge listing fees, or Facebook's recently launched marketplace, which is free, and found within the social media company's app.

CLOTHING

For women's, men's or children's clothing, there's Poshmark. The company charges $2.95 for items sold for under $15 and takes 20 percent for items sold for more than $15.

With ThredUP, the website will send you a box to fill with brand-name women's or children's clothing that it tries to sell for you if. You can keep 5 percent to as much as 80 percent of the amount an item is sold for, depending on the sell price. At Tradesy, you can list designer bags, shoes and clothing, with Tradesy taking as much as 17.8 percent of the sale price.

You can also selling used clothing on eBay, which may charge some listing fees.

FURNITURE

For couches, mirrors and other household items, try Craigslist or Facebook marketplace. Some good photos in the listing, and measurements of the items, can help them better attract a buyer. But with those options, only accept cash or online payments such as PayPal, since requests to pay by check can be a sign of a scam.

If you live in New York, Washington or northern New Jersey, AptDeco lets you list used furniture and can arrange for shipping and delivery, but charges sellers 23 percent of the price an item is sold for.

GIFT CARDS

If you got a gift card over the holidays you know you won't use, you can sell them at a number of sites including CardCash, Cardpool and Giftcard Zen. How much money you get depends on a number of factors, including how likely someone else will want to buy it from the gift card seller. Recently, CardCash was offering $87 for a $100 gift card from Target, a $13 loss. You can also trying selling it on your own through eBay.

TOYS

For unopened toys such as Lego sets or American Doll dresses, try the Brian's Toys website. It will quote you the price it will pay on its site, or download the Brian's Toys app, which lets you scan the toy's barcode for a quote. You can also try eBay, Craigslist or Amazon to sell unwanted toys.

Explore further: EBay cuts auction listing fees for casual sellers

Related Stories

EBay trying to encourage people to sell more items

January 26, 2010

(AP) -- EBay hopes to lure more sellers by essentially doing away with "listing" fees for people who occasionally auction items on its site. Instead it will take a cut of the final selling price.

EBay adjusts rules for avoiding 'listing' fees

March 15, 2011

(AP) -- EBay Inc. has tweaked the requirements for avoiding "listing" fees when auctioning items on its site, letting users list up to 50 items each month at any starting price and allowing them to add the "Buy it Now" option ...

Recommended for you

Microbes help turn Greek yogurt waste into fuel

December 13, 2017

Consumers across the world enjoy Greek yogurt for its taste, texture, and protein-packed punch. Reaching that perfect formula, however, generates large volumes of food waste in the form of liquid whey. Now researchers in ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.