Nobel laureate Steven Chu to be honored at UMass Lowell

November 13, 2016

Nobel laureate Steven Chu will receive an honorary degree from University of Massachusetts Lowell this week.

The former U.S. secretary of energy is being honored for his contributions to and the nation's work to advance the pursuit of .

Chu and two other scientists won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1997 for the development of methods to cool and trap atoms with laser light.

Chancellor Jacquie Moloney will present Chu with the honorary degree Wednesday during a ceremony with UMass Lowell faculty, staff and students at University Crossing.

The ceremony will be followed by Chu's presentation, "Climate Change and a Path to Clean Energy."

Chu is a professor of molecular and cellular physiology in the medical school at Stanford University.

Explore further: Nobel laureate receives Breakthrough Prize in Fundamental Physics

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