Italy quake made ground move 70cm: scientists

November 1, 2016
Cracks on the road outside the centre of Norcia, central Italy pictured a day after a 6.5-magnitude earthquake struck on October 30, 2016

Areas hit by Italy's 6.5-magnitude quake displaced the ground by up to 70 centimetres (27.5 inches), Italian scientists reported on Tuesday.

Satellite images found that Sunday's tremor deformed the landscape over 130 square kilometres (50 square miles), the Italian National Research Council said in a statement.

The biggest displacement was in the Castelluccio region, near the small town of Norcia, which lay only six kilometres (3.7 miles) from the epicentre, it said. The ground in this region was pushed up or sank by up to 70cm.

The quake, measuring a powerful 6.5-magnitude according to Italian monitors, struck at a very shallow depth. It was the latest in a string of seismic shocks to hit central Italy this year.

The event was followed by around 1,100 after-shocks, including 19 quakes registering between four and five magnitude and 240 of between three and four magnitude, the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology said.

The strongest was 4.8, occurring on Tuesday shortly before 0800 GMT.

Explore further: Italy quake struck notorious seismic hotspot

Related Stories

Italy quake struck notorious seismic hotspot

August 24, 2016

The deadly earthquake that struck central Italy before dawn Wednesday occurred in a notorious seismic hotspot, and dangerous aftershocks are possible, scientists said.

Italy quake was new shock, typical of region: experts

October 27, 2016

The powerful tremors which shook central Italy on Wednesday were the product of a new earthquake rather than aftershocks from one that devastated the town of Amatrice in August, Italian experts say.

How shallow, deep earthquakes differ

August 26, 2016

Italy's earthquake was a lot weaker than the one in Myanmar, but it did far more damage because it happened at a shallower depth. The Associated Press explains the difference between shallow and deep earthquakes.

Recommended for you

Afromontane forests and climate change

January 17, 2019

In the world of paleoecology, little has been known about the historical record of ecosystems in the West African highlands, especially with regard to glacial cycles amidst a shifting climate and their effects on species ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.