Greenland sets record temperatures, ice melts early

September 13, 2016
Temperature records in Greenland have been broken this year after parts of the territory's vast ice sheet began melting unusually early

Temperature records were broken in Greenland this year after parts of the territory's vast ice sheet began melting unusually early, the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI) said Tuesday.

"These new results give us new and robust evidence of the tendency of warmer temperatures in the Arctic continuing," John Cappelen, a climatologist at the institute, said in a statement.

The average summer temperature was 8.2 degrees Celsius (46.8 degrees Fahrenheit) in Tasiilaq on Greenland's southeast coast, the highest since records began in 1895 and 2.3 Celsius above the average between 1981 and 2010.

New highs were also recorded in the south and in the northeast this summer, after a balmy spring that broke records at six out of 14 weather stations in the territory.

In April, DMI said that the seasonal melting of Greenland's vast had reached record levels, prompting it to check that its "models were still working properly."

Around 12 percent of the ice sheet was found to be melting almost one month earlier than the previous top three dates for when more than 10 percent of the ice had begun to melt, it said.

The Greenland ice sheet, a potentially massive contributor to rising sea levels, lost mass twice as fast between 2003 and 2010 as during the entire 20th century, researchers said in December.

Explore further: Scientists: Greenland ice sheet is melting freakishly early

Related Stories

CryoSat reveals recent Greenland ice loss

July 12, 2016

In the most detailed picture to date, information from ESA's CryoSat satellite reveals how melting ice in Greenland has recently contributed twice as much to sea-level rise as the prior two decades.

NASA maps thawed areas under Greenland ice sheet

August 4, 2016

NASA researchers have helped produce the first map showing what parts of the bottom of the massive Greenland Ice Sheet are thawed—key information in better predicting how the ice sheet will react to a warming climate.

Greenland's ice sheet from 40,000 feet

March 30, 2016

The Oceans Melting Greenland (OMG) field campaign team is flying NASA's G-III aircraft at about 40,000 feet. On a clear day, this altitude also provides a stunning perspective of one of the world's two great ice sheets (the ...

Recommended for you

9 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

leetennant
4.3 / 5 (11) Sep 13, 2016
The word 'record' now added to 'global' and 'average' as impenetrable scientific terms that confuse laymen.
leetennant
4.3 / 5 (12) Sep 13, 2016
The Greenland ice sheet is 400,000 to 800,000 years old. And it is melting. But, hey, Erik the Red did a mediaeval marketing campaign during the MWP in Northern Europe. That is way more compelling.

Almost all of "Greenland" was covered by a kilometre-thick (or more) ice sheet, even when the Vikings first arrived. Drill cores from the ice sheet have yearly layers going back hundreds of thousands of years. AND IT IS NOW MELTING.

So the idea that temperatures were "warmer 1000 years ago than today" is not only unlikely but also irrelevant. Since it didn't melt the ice sheet. Which is melting now.

General observation from proxy data is that the global-average temperature variations experienced in the Medieval Warm Period and the Little Ice Age were smaller deviations from the norm than we are experiencing in the 21st century.

Like I said, the word 'record' is not hard to comprehend, really, is it? Even if we're technically talking about a 150 year temp record.
humy
3.2 / 5 (6) Sep 14, 2016
The word 'record' now added to 'global' and 'average' as impenetrable scientific terms that confuse laymen.

No layperson I know of is in the slightest 'confused' by the words 'record' or 'global' or 'average' as the meaning of these words are extremely easy to understand even by the average halfwit.
barakn
4.1 / 5 (9) Sep 14, 2016
The halfwits Shootist and Antigoracle should be around shortly to prove you wrong and serenade you with tales of Chicken Little and polar bears.
Shootist
1 / 5 (6) Sep 18, 2016
Dairy and wheat farms existed for 400 years on Greenland between 800 CE and 1200 CE. That is a historical fact.

Are there dairy and wheat farms extant on Greenland today? No. It is too cold. And that's a fact, as well, whether you like it or not.

Another fact? The climate changes. Change is the very nature of a chaotic system. The world's climate has been both warmer and colder and within historic times.

leetennant
5 / 5 (3) Sep 18, 2016
It's only two comments up, Shootist. Read it again.
howhot3
5 / 5 (4) Sep 18, 2016
Call a spade a spade; @Shootlist is a leir. He doesn't know beans about shit Greenland. He can prove his claims to all off us by just showing any kind of archaeological proof, but I seriously doubt the leir has any. @leetennant nailed it.
leetennant
5 / 5 (1) Sep 19, 2016
Call a spade a spade; @Shootlist is a leir. He doesn't know beans about shit Greenland. He can prove his claims to all off us by just showing any kind of archaeological proof, but I seriously doubt the leir has any. @leetennant nailed it.


Don't I always ;-)

*takes a bow*
howhot3
5 / 5 (2) Sep 19, 2016
Yeap. Sorry for my Scottish accent getting in the way; when I was saying *leir* I meant the *liar* but you caught me drift. Applauds to the @leetennant, excellent take down.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.