First test of driverless minibus in Paris Saturday

September 24, 2016
Paris's transport authority carries out its first test of a driverless minibus on September 24, 2016

The French capital's transport authority will on Saturday carry out its first test of a driverless minibus, in the hope that regular routes for the hi-tech vehicles will be up and running within two years.

The electric-powered driverless EZ10 minibus, able to carry up to 12 passengers, has already been tested on closed circuits in Japan, Singapore and California and in a in Helsinki.

One of the self-driving shuttle buses, made by French hi-tech firm Easymile, will on Saturday run along a special circuit in Paris on a pedestrianised street near the River Seine.

The bus will travel at 25 kilometres (15 miles) an hour and for RATP, the transport authority for the Paris region, it is the start of a series of tests.

The second test, to be held in the French capital before the end of the year, will see the EZ10 running between two major transport hubs, the Lyon and Austerlitz train stations.

"The autonomous vehicle presents an opportunity for new services notably in less densely populated areas," RATP president Elisabeth Borne said in a statement.

The east-central French town of Lyon carried out its own test on a driverless minibus this month.

Explore further: 'World first' as driverless buses take passengers in France

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RichManJoe
not rated yet Sep 24, 2016
Buses, trucks, taxis - lots of drivers are very shortly going to be looking for jobs. I have heard no one in the high tech industry addressing this - what are they going to do, retrain and become computer programmers?
Whydening Gyre
not rated yet Sep 24, 2016
To paraphrase G of Otto - Wait'll AI takes over....
We'll ALL be on a permanent vacation...
rrrander
not rated yet Sep 25, 2016
Buses, trucks, taxis - lots of drivers are very shortly going to be looking for jobs. I have heard no one in the high tech industry addressing this - what are they going to do, retrain and become computer programmers?


Decades ago, Buckminster Fuller suggested that 60% of the jobs people do add nothing to the economy and the "betterment" of mankind since the people cost far more they produce. They're just letting the computers take over the same jobs. In other words, it would be cheaper for society (the 40%) to support these people than to let them support themselves.
Edenlegaia
5 / 5 (1) Sep 26, 2016
Buses, trucks, taxis - lots of drivers are very shortly going to be looking for jobs. I have heard no one in the high tech industry addressing this - what are they going to do, retrain and become computer programmers?


Why not? That or something else. And damn, they can become rioters if they're not happy. They'll have plenty of time for that.
antialias_physorg
5 / 5 (1) Sep 26, 2016
on a pedestrianised street near the River Seine.

Ah. I was going to say: "In Paris traffic? No way."

On the other hand if they ever do get it to work in regular Paris traffic then that'll be the day when we can get rid of the steering wheel all over the world.

Buses, trucks, taxis - lots of drivers are very shortly going to be looking for jobs. I have heard no one in the high tech industry addressing this - what are they going to do, retrain and become computer programmers?

The larger picture, here, is that we're slowly moving from a world where people have to work for a living to a world where people don't need to. The easier jobs to replace will fall by the wayside, first. This is problematic, but there is no other way to do it if we ever want to rid ourselves of wage-slavery (and the inequalities that money imposes in general).

And damn, they can become rioters if they're not happy.

In France they already are. Protests are a national hobby.

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