Climate change spells worse typhoons for China, Japan: study

September 5, 2016
Three different tropical cyclones spinning over the western Pacific Ocean on August 7, 2006. The cyclone on the lower right has intensified into a typhoon. Credit: NASA

China, Taiwan, Japan and the Koreas will experience more violent typhoons under climate change, said researchers Monday, presenting evidence for a recent rise in storm intensity caused by ocean warming.

Scientists have struggled to identify changes in the intensity and frequency of over the northwest Pacific ocean—never mind trying to pinpoint a role for .

Contradictory trends emerge from records such as the Joint Typhoon Warming Center and the Japan Meteorological Agency—the two most widely-used data sets in typhoon research, according to the US-based study authors Wei Mei and Shang-Ping Xie.

They have now corrected the available data for differences in methodology and discovered a single, clear trend.

"Over the past 37 years, typhoons that strike east and southeast Asia have intensified by 12-15 percent," they wrote in the journal Nature Geoscience.

And the data showed this intensification, in turn, was linked to ocean surface warming—possibly caused by climate change, though this is yet to be proven.

Projections for if humans continue to emit planet-harming greenhouse gases, said the team, "suggest that typhoons striking eastern mainland China, Taiwan, Korea and Japan will intensify further.

"Given disproportionate damages by intense typhoons, this represents a heightened threat to people and properties in the region."

The human population in these coastal areas was growing fast, they pointed out, and sea levels were rising.

The world's nations concluded a pact in Paris last December to halt the march of , which threatens stronger storms, longer droughts and land-gobbling sea-level rise.

This would be achieved by curbing the emission of heat-trapping gases from the use of fossil fuels.

Explore further: Tropical cyclones on track to grow more intense as temperatures rise

More information: Nature Geoscience, nature.com/articles/doi:10.1038/ngeo2792

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JongDan
1.9 / 5 (9) Sep 05, 2016
I predict for the next 10 years East Asia will have no major typhoon. Last times climatologists made such a prediction, it was about hurricanes in the USA, and the following seasons were unusually quiet.
gkam
2.2 / 5 (9) Sep 05, 2016
The damage is from the intensity of the storms instead of their number.
mememine69
1.4 / 5 (9) Sep 05, 2016
Climate change science agrees the planet isn't flat and refuse to say their CO2 hell is as real as they say the planet isn't flat.
Will science say it before it's too late to say it?
Exaggerating vague climate science makes you neck tattooed scholars worse than Bush.


JongDan
3.2 / 5 (5) Sep 05, 2016
The damage is from the intensity of the storms instead of their number.

The increased damage is also from higher living standards.
SamB
1.8 / 5 (8) Sep 05, 2016
I predict for the next 10 years East Asia will have no major typhoon. Last times climatologists made such a prediction, it was about hurricanes in the USA, and the following seasons were unusually quiet.

Yes, I have seen the same thing for winter/summer predictions in eastern Canada. The funny thing is even when they are dead wrong (as is usually the case) they insist on doing it all over again the next year and expect the public to believe in their harebrained horoscopes. It would do wonders for their reputations if they would just admit they have no idea what will happen.

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