Unapproved genetically modified wheat found in Washington

Federal authorities say genetically modified wheat that's not approved for sale or production in the United States has been found growing in a field in Washington state.

The discovery could affect U.S. trade with countries that have concerns about genetically modified foods. Several Asian countries temporarily banned U.S. wheat imports after genetically modified wheat was found in Oregon in 2013.

The U.S. Agriculture Department said Friday that a farmer discovered 22 herbicide-resistant wheat plants growing in an unplanted field. The department says it's taking action and "has no evidence of GE wheat in commerce."

The USDA says it's working with the farmer to ensure that none of the modified wheat gets to the market. It's holding and testing the farmer's entire wheat harvest.


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Citation: Unapproved genetically modified wheat found in Washington (2016, July 29) retrieved 19 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-07-us-banned-genetically-wheat-washington.html
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Jul 29, 2016
GM testing an entire wheat harvest.... Is that BS I smell?

With a wind pollinated crop such as wheat; GM pollen could affect any ear on any stalk in the field. Or any ear in any field that the original seeds where grown in.

The answer is blowing in the wind. As is the smell of a promise to close the door after the pollen has propagated.

Jul 30, 2016
Well, that horse has left the barn.

It was extremely stupid to believe GM plants wouldn't escape into the wild. Once they were released from the lab the game was over.

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