Australia moving up in the world... literally

July 30, 2016
Australia's coordinates are currently out by more than a metre and the discrepancy could cause major headaches for new technologies which require precise location data, such as the satellite navigation systems used on smartphones

Australia will adjust its latitude and longitude, a government science body says, to put the vast country into alignment with global navigation satellite systems.

The nation's coordinates are currently out by more than a metre, Geoscience Australia says, and the discrepancy could cause major headaches for possible new technologies such as driverless cars which require precise location data.

"We have to adjust our lines of latitude and longitude... so that the that we all use on our smartphones these days can align with all the digital map information," Geoscience's Dan Jaksa told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation this week.

Australia currently moves north by about seven centimetres each year due to normal tectonic motion and Jaksa said the change was needed "to keep pace with that".

He said smartphones were already accurate to within 5-10 metres, but shrinking the gap would be crucial in coming years, particularly with greater use of remotely-operated vehicles in farming and mining.

"(And) around the corner, in the not too distant future, we are going to have possibly or at least autonomous vehicles where, 1.5 metres, well, you're in the middle of the road or you're in another lane," he said on Thursday.

"So the information needs to be as accurate as the information we are collecting."

Australia's local coordinate system, the Geocentric Datum of Australia, was last updated in 1994 and officials believe it will be out by 1.8 metres by 2020 unless corrected.

New data on the country's coordinates is expected to be available from 1 January 2017.

Explore further: Where we are on the road to driverless cars

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docroc67
3.5 / 5 (4) Jul 30, 2016
While they're at it, why not move it a few degrees farther south to cool it off.
antialias_physorg
3.4 / 5 (5) Jul 31, 2016
"... 1.5 metres, well, you're in the middle of the road or you're in another lane,"


At least the accident reports would be surreal: "The driver swerved into the oncoming traffic because of continental drift"
Gigel
not rated yet Jul 31, 2016
I always thought that GPS had an error of around 100 meters in determining the position. Did they just made it precise to below 1 meter?
BSD
not rated yet Jul 31, 2016
While they're at it, why not move it a few degrees farther south to cool it off.


Does this mean if we all paddle faster, we can move us back down south where we should be?
antialias_physorg
3.7 / 5 (3) Aug 01, 2016
I always thought that GPS had an error of around 100 meters in determining the position. Did they just made it precise to below 1 meter?

Standard augmented GPS systems go to below 10 meters accuracy (e.g. WAAS will get you roughly 3 meters accuracy).

Some receivers combine the russian GLONASS and the GPS signals and can get down to about 2.5m accuracy.

The european GALILEO system (set to be completed by 2020) will have positioning to within 1 meter (unencrypted) and 1cm (encrypted). *

*All values 'outdoors'...for urban cayon/indoors values this article has some preliminary numbers of the various combinations (note that as of the writing of this article only 4 GALILEO sattelites are in orbit)
http://www.gsa.eu...services

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