Worldwide quantum web may be possible with help from graphs

June 8, 2016 by Lisa Zyga feature
Physicists have shown that, by describing a quantum network as a mathematical graph, they can determine the best way to use quantum repeaters to achieve long-distance entanglement. Credit: Epping et al. ©2016 IOP Publishing

(Phys.org)—One of the most ambitious endeavors in quantum physics right now is to build a large-scale quantum network that could one day span the entire globe. In a new study, physicists have shown that describing quantum networks in a new way—as mathematical graphs—can help increase the distance that quantum information can be transmitted. Compared to classical networks, quantum networks have potential advantages such as better security and being faster under certain circumstances.

"A worldwide network may appear quite similar to the internet—a huge number of devices connected in a way that allows the exchange of information between any of them," coauthor Michael Epping, a physicist at the University of Waterloo in Canada, told Phys.org. "But the crucial difference is that the laws of quantum theory will be dominant for the description of that information. For example, the state of the fundamental information carrier can be a superposition of the basis states 0 and 1. By now, several advantages in comparison to classical information are known, such as prime number factorization and secret communication. However, the biggest benefit of quantum networks might well be discovered by future research in the rapidly developing field of theory."

Quantum networks involve sending entangled particles across long distances, which is challenging because particle loss and decoherence tend to scale exponentially with the distance.

In their study published in the New Journal of Physics, Epping and coauthors Hermann Kampermann and Dagmar Bruß at the Heinrich Heine University of Düsseldorf in Germany have shown that describing physical quantum networks as abstract mathematical graphs offers a way to optimize the architecture of quantum networks and achieve entanglement across the longest possible distances.

"A network is a physical system," Epping explained. "Examples of a network are the internet and labs at different buildings connected by optical fibers. These networks may be described by mathematical graphs at an abstract level, where the network structure—which consists of nodes that exchange quantum information via links—is represented graphically by vertices connected by edges. An important task for quantum networks is to distribute entangled states amongst the nodes, which are used as a resource for various information protocols afterwards. In our approach, the graph description of the network, which might come to your mind quite naturally, is related to the distributed quantum state."

In the language of graphs, this distributed quantum state becomes a quantum graph state. The main advantage of the graph state description is that it allows researchers to compare different quantum networks that produce the same quantum state, and to see which network is better at distributing entanglement across large distances.

Quantum networks differ mainly in how they use quantum repeaters—devices that offer a way to distribute entanglement across large distances by subdividing the long-distance transmission channels into shorter channels.

Here, the researchers produced an entangled graph state for a quantum network by initially defining vertices with both nodes and quantum repeaters. Then they described how measurements at the repeater stations modify this graph state. Due to these modifications, the vertices associated with quantum repeaters are removed so that only the network nodes serve as vertices in the final , while the connecting quantum repeater lines become edges.

In the final graph state, the weights of the edges correspond to the number of quantum repeaters and how far apart they are. Consequently, by changing the weights of the edges, the new approach can optimize a given performance metric, such as security or speed. In other words, the method can determine the best way to use quantum repeaters to achieve long-distance entanglement for large-scale quantum networks.

In the future, the researchers plan to investigate the demands for practical implementation. They also want to extend these results to a newer research field called " coding" by generalizing the quantum repeater concept to quantum routers, which can make quantum networks more secure against macroscopic errors.

Explore further: Physicists find extreme violation of local realism in quantum hypergraph states

More information: Michael Epping, Hermann Kampermann and Dagmar Bruß. "Large-scale quantum networks based on graphs." New Journal of Physics. DOI: 10.1088/1367-2630/18/5/053036

Related Stories

Three 'twisted' photons in 3 dimensions

February 29, 2016

Researchers at the Institute of Quantum Optics and Quantum Information, the University of Vienna, and the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona have achieved a new milestone in quantum physics: they were able to entangle three ...

All quantum communication involves nonlocality

April 1, 2016

Researchers of CWI, University of Gdansk, Gdansk University of Technology, Adam Mickiewicz University and the University of Cambridge have proven that quantum communication is based on nonlocality. They show that whenever ...

Physicists quantify the usefulness of 'quantum weirdness'

April 13, 2016

(Phys.org)—For the past 100 years, physicists have been studying the weird features of quantum physics, and now they're trying to put these features to good use. One prominent example is that quantum superposition (also ...

Recommended for you

Weyl fermions exhibit paradoxical behavior

May 23, 2017

Theoretical physicists have found Weyl fermions to exhibit paradoxical behavior in contradiction to a 30-year-old fundamental theory of electromagnetism. The discovery has possible applications in spintronics. The study ...

4 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

stevecems
3.7 / 5 (3) Jun 08, 2016
Would this mean instantaneous transfer of information and therefore, financial centers would not need to be close to the trading centers to trade stocks? In addition, there would not be a lag in internet communications.
antialias_physorg
4 / 5 (4) Jun 09, 2016
Would this mean instantaneous transfer of information

No. Even when using quantum physics information transfer is still limited to the speed of light.
overmandan
3 / 5 (2) Jun 10, 2016
Gentalman, Ladies

No on the speed of light as limitation. I do not believe that spin numbers, for example, on collapsed wave function induced by an observation are limited by the speed of light, or anything else (if one subscribes, since this is all a model in the end). This phenomena is the key exploit, yes? The details of how to engineer a mechanism based on observation of entangles pairs at large distance is elusive to me, but I trust this has been worked out, otherwise the article above would not exist.

Respectfully,
So yes on instantaneous communication.
-Dan
epoxy
Jun 11, 2016
This comment has been removed by a moderator.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.