Team predicts a universe crowded with black holes

universe
This is the "South Pillar" region of the star-forming region called the Carina Nebula. Like cracking open a watermelon and finding its seeds, the infrared telescope "busted open" this murky cloud to reveal star embryos tucked inside finger-like pillars of thick dust. Credit: NASA

A new study published in Nature presents one of the most complete models of matter in the universe and predicts hundreds of massive black hole mergers each year observable with the second generation of gravitational wave detectors.

The model anticipated the massive observed by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory. The two colliding masses created the first directly detected and confirmed Einstein's general theory of relativity.

"The universe isn't the same everywhere," said Richard O'Shaughnessy, assistant professor in RIT's School of Mathematical Sciences, and co-author of the study led by Krzysztof Belczynski from Warsaw University. "Some places produce many more binary black holes than others. Our study takes these differences into careful account."

Massive that collapse upon themselves and end their lives as black holes, like the pair LIGO detected, are extremely rare, O'Shaughnessy said. They are less evolved, "more primitive stars," that occur in special configurations in the universe. These stars from the early universe are made of more pristine hydrogen, a gas which makes them "Titans among stars," at 40 to 100 solar masses. In contrast, younger generations of stars consumed the corpses of their predecessors containing heavy elements, which stunted their growth.

"Because LIGO is so much more sensitive to these heavy black holes, these regions of pristine gas that make heavy black holes are extremely important," O'Shaughnessy said. "These rare regions act like factories for building identifiable pairs of black holes."

O'Shaughnessy and his colleagues predict that massive black holes like these spin in a stable way, with orbits that remain in the same plane. The model shows that the alignment of these massive black holes are impervious to the tiny kick that follows the stars' core collapse. The same kick can change the alignment of smaller black holes and rock their orbital plane.

The calculations reported in Nature are the most detailed calculations of its kind ever performed, O'Shaughnessy said. He likens the model to a laboratory for assessing future prospects for gravitational wave astronomy. Other gravitational wave astronomers are now using the model in their own investigations as well.

"We've already seen that we can learn a lot about Einstein's theory and massive stars, just from this one event," said O'Shaughnessy, also a member of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration that helped make and interpret the first discovery of gravitational waves. "LIGO is not going to see 1,000 black holes like these each year, but many of them will be even better and more exciting because we will have a better instrument—better glasses to view them with and better techniques."

O'Shaughnessy is a member of RIT's Center for Computational Relativity and Gravitation where he collaborates with Carlos Lousto, professor in RIT's School of Mathematical Sciences and a member of the LIGO Scientific Collaboration.

"We feel like parents of a beautiful daughter called gravitational wave astronomy born a few months ago and seeing her grow more gorgeous by the day," Lousto said.


Explore further

After the discovery: Researchers study implications of gravitational waves

More information: The first gravitational-wave source from the isolated evolution of two stars in the 40–100 solar mass range, Nature, nature.com/articles/doi:10.1038/nature18322
Journal information: Nature

Citation: Team predicts a universe crowded with black holes (2016, June 22) retrieved 24 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-06-team-universe-crowded-black-holes.html
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Jun 22, 2016
Lots and lots of them?

Well, I wasn't planning to go there, anyway.

Jun 22, 2016
Lots and lots of them?

Well, I wasn't planning to go there, anyway.

Thanks. We wouldn't want to know what happens when a black hole meets an a-hole.

Jun 22, 2016
Lots of black holes - lots of matter. All dark.

Jun 22, 2016
"Thanks. We wouldn't want to know what happens when a black hole meets an a-hole."
---------------------------------
Why do you have your fixation on holes?

Jun 23, 2016
Lots of black holes - lots of matter. All dark.

Black Holes Matter.

Jun 23, 2016
Could a universe keep expending when it's filled with black holes instead of stars?

Jun 23, 2016
Could a universe keep expending when it's filled with black holes instead of stars?


It wouldn't matter, space(time) doesn't seem to interact with gravity in a way that it can stop it from expanding, gravity only curves it.

Also gravity-wise there is no difference between a star or a black hole of the same mass. If the sun would suddenly turn into a BH (with still the same mass of the sun), earth would still rotate around it the same way it does now.

So no, neither stars nor BHs influence the expansion of the universe and if it did, it wouldn't matter if it were stars or BHs anyway.

Jun 23, 2016
We're going to run out of BHs if this keeps up at the prognosticated rate. Then what do we do to continue seducing our imaginations? I know, PINK HOLES......there got it covered, all the colors of the rainbow.

Jun 23, 2016
We're going to run out of BHs if this keeps up at the prognosticated rate. Then what do we do to continue seducing our imaginations? I know, PINK HOLES......there got it covered, all the colors of the rainbow.

So, Benni...
We've not seen your own conjectures as to what observation appears to tell us.
Any guesses?

Jun 24, 2016
We're going to run out of BHs if this keeps up at the prognosticated rate. Then what do we do to continue seducing our imaginations? I know, PINK HOLES......there got it covered, all the colors of the rainbow.


We all know you've never seen a pink hole.

Jun 25, 2016
This comment has been removed by a moderator.

Jun 26, 2016
You are what you eat!

LOL.
Oh, AGreatWanker, you should be eating your meds. Please, you ignore the sound advice of your health care professional, at your own peril.
PS. You are only fooling yourself with your suck-puppets and quite sad that, the only attention you get, is from yourself.

Jun 26, 2016
We're going to run out of BHs if this keeps up at the prognosticated rate. Then what do we do to continue seducing our imaginations? I know, PINK HOLES......there got it covered, all the colors of the rainbow.

So, Benni...
We've not seen your own conjectures as to what observation appears to tell us.
Any guesses?


You unable to read? PINK......there, loud enough?


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