Micro-camera can be injected with a syringe

June 27, 2016
Regular arrangement of doublet lenses directly fabricated on a CMOS image sensor. Credit: Timo Gissibl

German engineers have created a camera no bigger than a grain of salt that could change the future of health imaging—and clandestine surveillance.

Using 3-D printing, researchers from the University of Stuttgart built a three-lens , and fit it onto the end of an optical fibre the width of two hairs.

Such technology could be used as minimally-intrusive endoscopes for exploring inside the human body, the engineers reported in the journal Nature Photonics.

It could also be deployed in virtually invisible security monitors, or mini-robots with "autonomous vision".

3-D printing—also known as additive manufacturing—makes three-dimensional objects by depositing layer after layer of materials such as plastic, metal or ceramic.

Due to manufacturing limitations, lenses cannot currently be made small enough for key uses in the medical field, said the team, which believe its 3-D printing method may represent "a paradigm shift".

It took only a few hours to design, manufacture and test the tiny eye, which yielded "high optical performances and tremendous compactness," the researchers reported.

The compound lens is just 100 micrometres (0.1 millimetres or 0.004 inches) wide, and 120 micrometres with its casing.

Image of a multi-lens system with a diameter of 600 µm next to a doublet lenses with a diameter of 120 µm. Credit: Timo Gissibl

It can focus on images from a distance of 3.0 mm, and relay them over the length of a 1.7-metre (5.6-foot) optical fibre to which it is attached.

The "imaging system" fits comfortably inside a standard syringe needle, said the team, allowing for delivery into a human organ, or even the brain.

"Endoscopic applications will allow for non-invasive and non-destructive examination of small objects in the medical as well as the industrial sector," they wrote.

The compound lense can also be printed onto image sensor other than optical fibres, such as those used in digital cameras.

Image of a multi-lens system with a diameter of 600 µm surrounded by four doublet lenses with a diameter of 120 µm. Credit: Timo Gissibl

Colored SEM-image of a miniature triplet lens directly fabricated on an optical fiber. Credit: Timo Gissibl

Explore further: Super-sharp images through thin optical fibres

More information: Two-photon direct laser writing of ultracompact multi-lens objectives, Nature Photonics, nature.com/articles/doi:10.1038/nphoton.2016.121

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taxicar
2.6 / 5 (5) Jun 27, 2016
That is so old...secret services, usa/gb/kgb...etc...have already cameras in the street-concrete or in the woods. practically, everything that is build after 1995 is "smart"...it can hear and see everything. we are simple aunts in the crowd/matrix. they control everything and the process is irreversible....before...there was also smart-dust....dust that can flow everywhere and collect data.
borek_zanda
4 / 5 (1) Jun 28, 2016
I thought such device is called "endoscope".
antialias_physorg
3 / 5 (2) Jun 28, 2016
I thought such device is called "endoscope".

Probably why they say right there in the article:
"Such technology could be used as minimally-intrusive endoscopes "

"Endo" just means "within"...some of the application fields they list aren't 'endo'.

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