Image: Hubble uncovers a mysterious dwarf galaxy

Image: Hubble uncovers a mysterious dwarf galaxy
Credit: NASA/ESA

The drizzle of stars scattered across this image forms a galaxy known as UGC 4879. UGC 4879 is an irregular dwarf galaxy—as the name suggests, galaxies of this type are a little smaller and messier than their cosmic cousins, lacking the majestic swirl of a spiral or the coherence of an elliptical.

This galaxy is also very isolated. There are about 2.3 million light years between UGC 4879 and its closest neighbor, Leo A, which is about the same distance as that between the Andromeda Galaxy and the Milky Way.

This galaxy's isolation means that it has not interacted with any surrounding galaxies, making it an ideal laboratory for studying star formation uncomplicated by interactions with other . Studies of UGC 4879 have revealed a significant amount of star formation in the first 4 billion years after the Big Bang, followed by a strange 9-billion-year lull in that ended 1 billion years ago by a more recent re-ignition.

The reason for this behavior, however, remains mysterious, and the solitary galaxy continues to provide ample study material for astronomers looking to understand the complex mysteries of star birth throughout the universe.


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Hubble peers at a distinctly disorganized dwarf galaxy

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Citation: Image: Hubble uncovers a mysterious dwarf galaxy (2016, June 13) retrieved 15 June 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2016-06-image-hubble-uncovers-mysterious-dwarf.html
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Jun 13, 2016
Studies of UGC 4879 have revealed a significant amount of star formation in the first 4 billion years after the Big Bang, followed by a strange 9-billion-year lull in star formation that ended 1 billion years ago by a more recent re-ignition.


Periodic instability of the growing core star could explain it. Perhaps the core even split apart at one point, leading to a sustained lull in activity as it slowly grew back to it's former glory.

Jun 13, 2016
It is a galaxy, not a star.

Jun 14, 2016
Sub: UPE MODEL leads to Cosmic Pot Energy of the Universe
Spirals, Sphericals and Ellipticals form integrated Energy balance explained in my paper-Universal Plasma Energy -uPE model-1991 IEEE ICOPS- see my book on Vision of Cosmic PREM Universe-1995
several illustrations for space Science to catch-up were included -in search of cosmos Quest to answer space Plasma groups-late Nobel Laureate -Alfven- Cosmology Myth or Science.
Cosmic Pot Energy of The Universe- sTSCI symposium 2003 -my paper- in Log scale Light Years Dimensions-see also Carnegie 2003 Paper
http://www.scribd...del-2003
http://www.scribd...rse-2003
15 Books at LULU. http://www.lulu.c...jnani108

Jun 14, 2016
It is a galaxy, not a star.

Ah, the typical merger maniac, not listening at all. Got your ears on good buddy?

The galaxy growth is linked to the growth of the supermassive core star (grey hole). The galactic bulge leads the growth, the bigger the bulge the bigger the core. That is due to the core spewing new material forming the bulge.

And the maniacs fall in line, marking cheerleaders like Torby up, and logical thinkers down. It is the widespread state of the intellectual egomaniac, so pervasive in society. Been that way since the beginning. It is a condition of humanity.

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