Statoil to store energy from floating wind farm in batteries

March 21, 2016
Norwegian oil group Statoil is planning to store energy from a Scottish floating wind farm on a powerful battery storage system
Norwegian oil group Statoil is planning to store energy from a Scottish floating wind farm on a powerful battery storage system

Norwegian oil group Statoil said Monday it would store energy from a Scottish floating wind farm on a powerful battery storage system, in a pioneering pilot project.

The system's one megawatt-hour Lithium battery capacity corresponds to that of "more than two million iPhones," Statoil said in a statement, making it one of the world's most ambitious projects in the field.

The specialised website Recharge referred to the project as a "potentially game-changing system" in an industry where storage is a key issue.

Batteries are one of new frontiers in . Renewables producers can tap into stored energy to instantly meet peaks in demand or compensate for periods of low and poor sunshine.

Statoil's pilot project is due to be installed at the end of 2018 and hooked up to the world's first floating wind farm which is expected to begin producing electricity a year earlier, with five Hywind turbines placed 25 kilometres (15 miles) off the Scottish coast.

"Battery storage has the potential to mitigate intermittency (of wind energy) and optimise output," Statoil said in a statement.

"This can improve efficiency and lower costs for offshore wind," it added.

Dubbed Batwind, the battery system will be developed jointly with universities and Scottish suppliers, Statoil said.

Explore further: Consent granted to Scotland's floating offshore wind development

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Eikka
3 / 5 (2) Mar 21, 2016
The specialised website Recharge referred to the project as a "potentially game-changing battery storage system" in an industry where storage is a key issue.


1 MWh is between 5-10% of the annual energy consumption of a single household. It's a really tiny battery in the context of grid energy storage.

battery capacity corresponds to that of "more than two million iPhones,"


And that's the issue: all the lithium we can produce is already being used for making millions of iPhones, other cellphones, laptops, tablets, cameras, cars... There's not enough supply capacity to produce these batteries for millions of households as well.

The storage capacity demand for renewable energy are on the order of 1 TWh per country, which is a million MWh, or two million millon iPhones if you want to put it on the same comparison. There's got to be something cheaper and more abundant than lithium.
Da Schneib
5 / 5 (3) Mar 21, 2016
Great stuff. This is how renewables meet base demand despite their intermittent character.
kochevnik
3.7 / 5 (3) Mar 21, 2016
Eikka your comments are worthless as peak usage occurs while the sun is shining and normal people are awake, not late at night when the killjoy instinct awakens you
greenonions
5 / 5 (1) Mar 22, 2016
There are plenty of reasons to be optimistic that we will have plenty of lithium to provide for our needs for many decades to come. Here is just one interesting possibility - http://www.proact...140.html Don't pay old Eikka any mind - he/she always has to know that what is happening - cannot be happening - cuz Eikka scribbled something on the back of a napkin.
PPihkala
5 / 5 (1) Mar 25, 2016
I think that off-shore wind would be a good fit for underwater domes that would store compressed air. Pump air down into concrete domes situated at bottom when there is surplus electricity. Then let it out to generate electricity when demand is more than generated by wind. Nothing complicated or expensive in this compressed air storage.

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