Physicists find extreme violation of local realism in quantum hypergraph states

March 4, 2016 by Lisa Zyga feature
(a) The simplest hyperedge (connecting more than two vertices). (b) A fully connected five‐qubit graph state. (c) A fully connected four‐qubit hypergraph state, where every hyperedge connects exactly three vertices. Credit: Gachechiladze, et al.

(Phys.org)—Many quantum technologies rely on quantum states that violate local realism, which means that they either violate locality (such as when entangled particles influence each other from far away) or realism (the assumption that quantum states have well-defined properties, independent of measurement), or possibly both. Violation of local realism is one of the many counterintuitive, yet experimentally supported, characteristics of the quantum world.

Determining whether or not multiparticle quantum states violate local realism can be challenging. Now in a new paper, physicists have shown that a large family of multiparticle quantum states called hypergraph states violates local realism in many ways. The results suggest that these states may serve as useful resources for quantum technologies, such as quantum computers and detecting .

The physicists, Mariami Gachechiladze, Costantino Budroni, and Otfried Gühne at the University of Siegen in Germany, have published their paper on the quantum hypergraph states in a recent issue of Physical Review Letters.

The properties of multiparticle quantum systems are described by quantum states, some of which can be represented on a graph where each point corresponds to a particle and each edge to the interaction between particles. While some quantum states can be represented by ordinary graphs, others are represented by hypergraphs. On an ordinary graph, two points can be connected by an edge, while on a hypergraph, a hyperedge can connect more than two vertices. Whereas an ordinary edge is usually drawn as a straight line between two vertices, a hyperedge is depicted as a curve that wraps around three or more vertices.

All possible non‐equivalent four‐qubit hypergraph states. Credit: Gachechiladze, et al.

In the new study, the physicists discovered that quantum hypergraph states have perfect correlations that are highly nonlocal. As the scientists explain, this means that hypergraph states strongly violate local realism.

"We find a whole new class of elegantly described states that are highly entangled," Gachechiladze told Phys.org. "This class is a generalization of a well‐known and heavily used family of graph states."

The physicists also showed that the greater the number of particles in a quantum hypergraph state, the more strongly it violates local realism, with the strength increasing exponentially with the number of particles. In addition, even if a quantum hypergraph state loses one of its particles, it continues to violate local realism. This robustness to particle loss is in stark contrast to other types of quantum states, which no longer violate if they lose a particle. This property is particularly appealing for applications, since it might allow for more noise in experiments.

One such potential application is quantum computing, which may benefit because the exponential violation found here is expected to correspond to an exponential advantage for certain computation tasks. Another application is quantum metrology, where physicists take advantage of quantum properties to make extremely precise measurements that would not be possible using classical measurement techniques.

"High entanglement has been recognized to be the key for certain information‐theoretic tasks," Gachechiladze said. "We find that some hypergraph states can be used in quantum metrology, namely, in measuring some parameters with a very high precision using quantum measurements. Such quantum-enhanced measurement strategies may play an important role in future precision experiments, such as in the search for gravitational waves."

The researchers will further explore these possibilities in the future.

"We plan to investigate more in the direction of entanglement properties," Gachechiladze said. "Also we are working towards an experimental proposal to create hypergraph states using photons or trapped ions. Finally, we would like to employ this set of quantum states in applications such as measurement‐based quantum computation and error‐correcting codes."

Explore further: Physicists discover easy way to measure entanglement—on a sphere

More information: Mariami Gachechiladze, et al. "Extreme violation of local realism in quantum hypergraph states." Physical Review Letters. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.070401

Also at arXiv:1507.03570 [quant-ph]

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17 comments

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forumid001
5 / 5 (4) Mar 04, 2016
nice work, but really wonder what is the point of making a fuss of non-realism. Isn't it a well established idea since 1920s?
KBK
1.8 / 5 (10) Mar 04, 2016
That's when mainstream science (ie...controlled science, for the lesser mind) lost the trail on dimensional overlap systems, and went full bore stupid on materialist unilateral mundane realism.

We have to go back and reclaim the lost postulates so we can go forward again, with an actual functional multidimensional foundation in engineering sciences.
compose
Mar 04, 2016
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
forumid001
5 / 5 (1) Mar 04, 2016
"In the new study, the physicists discovered that quantum hypergraph states have perfect correlations that are highly nonlocal. As the scientists explain, this means that hypergraph states strongly violate local realism. "

The authors seem to treat nonlocal and nonseparabe as synonyms. That's misleading.

Thirteenth Doctor
4.6 / 5 (11) Mar 04, 2016
That's when mainstream science (ie...controlled science, for the lesser mind) lost the trail on dimensional overlap systems, and went full bore stupid on materialist unilateral mundane realism.

We have to go back and reclaim the lost postulates so we can go forward again, with an actual functional multidimensional foundation in engineering sciences.


What I don't understand is that why don't you and the other "non-mainstream" guys band together and formulate your own institute, put all your ideas together and shock the "lesser minds" with what you know and overturn "controlled science"?

All you guys do is whine about it here.
viko_mx
1 / 5 (4) Mar 04, 2016
in facts we can not observe the elementary particles out of their interaction with the cosmic matrix embedded in the cosmic vacuum. The physical connection between so called entangled particles is the same stucture.
Whydening Gyre
5 / 5 (5) Mar 04, 2016
in facts we can not observe the elementary particles out of their interaction with the cosmic matrix embedded in the cosmic vacuum. The physical connection between so called entangled particles is the same stucture.

Silly rabbit. They ARE the structure...
someone11235813
5 / 5 (3) Mar 04, 2016
That's when mainstream science (ie...controlled science, for the lesser mind) lost the trail on dimensional overlap systems, and went full bore stupid on materialist unilateral mundane realism.

We have to go back and reclaim the lost postulates so we can go forward again, with an actual functional multidimensional foundation in engineering sciences.


I think with a bit of reworking the above could be the foundation for a Monty Python sketch, along the lines of The Banter episode http://www.ibras....42.htm#2
viko_mx
1 / 5 (3) Mar 05, 2016
@Whydening Gyre

Would you be beneficial for you to be at least a little familiar with physics and to have an idea what you want to say. Scientific arguments are also unknown territory for you and because you have to defend unscientific dogmas without arguments you become nervous.

So do you have an idea where spreads magnetic field of permanent magnets or inductors?
In emty geometric space or in some physical environment?
exequus
2 / 5 (2) Mar 06, 2016
Any chance of scoring a four-flavored quark somewhere in the local cluster?
bluehigh
not rated yet Mar 06, 2016
The physical connection between so called entangled particles is the same stucture. - from an unpopular but interesting nutcase.


I've, in some ways, suggested a similar view. Difficult to conceptualise and the evidence Is entanglement itself. I tend to agree but it's open to derision due to lack of evidence.
(Shields up, IMHO).

On the other hand; Cosmic matrix and cosmic vacuum are undefined and meaningless.

Silly rabbit. They ARE the structure... - handcrafted silverware artiste

WG, a vague statement and unlikely.

(shields at 50%, the diltium crystals can't handle much more).

EyeNStein
not rated yet Mar 06, 2016
@Compose
Does the "quantum hypergraph state" represent something real - or is it just a some abstract concept? How to test or demonstrate it with experiment?


The whole point of the Copenhagen interpretation is that there is NO independent local realism. Nothing is "real" until you make a measurement, and the measurement you get depends entirely on the apparatus you chose to use when taking the measurement.
Using the single particle two slit experiment as an example of your "demonstrate it with experiment" the point where a single particle becomes real depends on the screen as much as the particle itself. The particle 'probably is' all over the room until your screen makes it a real measurement.

Of course this begs the question how does the wavy probably particle chose which wavy probably atom in the screen to become "real" with. We don't know! Copenhagen says it is unknowable. -Einstein when to his grave trying to find a way around this.
Phys1
3.9 / 5 (7) Mar 06, 2016
That's when mainstream science (ie...controlled science, for the lesser mind) lost the trail on dimensional overlap systems, and went full bore stupid on materialist unilateral mundane realism.

We have to go back and reclaim the lost postulates so we can go forward again, with an actual functional multidimensional foundation in engineering sciences.

And yet another arrogant fool posts word salad here.
compose
Mar 06, 2016
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
compose
Mar 06, 2016
This comment has been removed by a moderator.
theon
not rated yet Mar 06, 2016
Sigh. "Extreme violation of local realism" but no mention of the contextuality loophole. Nature is just local, information travels with the particles.
junqiaolee81
not rated yet Mar 07, 2016
Ponder to self: Perhaps the sense of space-time are nothing more than an interplay of entangled and isolated "states"; akin to the 3D world in a computer game (through "time", incrementally as defined by the CPU clock ticking away), where underlying it are nothing but mere codes that describes the associations and relationships between defined object (and thus creates an illusionary sense of "space-time").

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