Image: Hubble looks into a cosmic kaleidoscope

March 28, 2016, NASA
Credit: NASA, ESA, CXC, NRAO/AUI/NSF, STScI, and G. Ogrean (Stanford University), Acknowledgment: NASA, ESA, and J. Lotz (STScI), and the HFF team

At first glance, this cosmic kaleidoscope of purple, blue and pink offers a strikingly beautiful—and serene—snapshot of the cosmos. However, this multi-colored haze actually marks the site of two colliding galaxy clusters, forming a single object known as MACS J0416.1-2403 (or MACS J0416 for short).

MACS J0416 is located about 4.3 billion light-years from Earth, in the constellation of Eridanus. This image of the cluster combines data from three different telescopes: the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope (showing the galaxies and stars), the NASA Chandra X-ray Observatory (diffuse emission in blue), and the NRAO Jansky Very Large Array (diffuse emission in pink). Each telescope shows a different element of the cluster, allowing astronomers to study MACS J0416 in detail.

As with all galaxy clusters, MACS J0416 contains a significant amount of , which leaves a detectable imprint in visible light by distorting the images of background galaxies. In this image, this dark matter appears to align well with the blue-hued hot gas, suggesting that the two clusters have not yet collided; if the clusters had already smashed into one another, the dark matter and gas would have separated. MACS J0416 also contains other features—such as a compact core of hot gas—that would likely have been disrupted had a collision already occurred.

Together with five other , MACS J0416 is playing a leading role in the Hubble Frontier Fields program, for which this data was obtained. Owing to its huge mass, the cluster is in fact bending the light of background objects, acting as a magnifying lens. Astronomers can use this phenomenon to find galaxies that existed only hundreds of million years after the big bang.

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Tuxford
1 / 5 (2) Mar 28, 2016
suggesting that the two clusters have not yet collided; if the clusters had already smashed into one another, the dark matter and gas would have separated.


Simply a faulty assumption arising from the previous conclusion from observations of the Bullet Cluster apparent separation. Published assumptions easily become conclusions in modern Astrophysics.

As with all galaxy clusters, MACS J0416 contains a significant amount of dark matter


Because dark matter is just an observational consequence of concentrated matter: The region of space surrounding matter refracts the light, leading to erroneous assumption of Unseen Magic Matter (UMM). That empty space refracts light is supportive of SQK where space is not actually empty, but instead composed of undetectable sub-quantum diffusive elementals, whose changed concentration pattern due to the presence of matter in the cluster providing a sink where elementals drift toward, causes the refraction interpreted as UMM.

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