Human Go champion 'speechless' after 2nd loss to machine

March 10, 2016 by Youkyung Lee
Human Go champion 'speechless' after 2nd loss to machine
South Korean professional Go player Lee Sedol appears on the screen during the second match of the Google DeepMind Challenge Match against Google's artificial intelligence program, AlphaGo at the media room in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, March 10, 2016. Google's computer program AlphaGo defeated its human opponent, South Korean Go champion Lee Sedol, on Wednesday in the first face-off of a historic five-game match. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

The human Go champion said he was left "speechless" after his second straight loss to Google's Go-playing machine on Thursday in a highly-anticipated human versus machine face-off.

Lee Sedol, one of the best Go players in the world with 18 world championships, was grim and ashen after the game, which lasted more than four hours.

"I'm quite speechless," he said at the press conference that was livestreamed on YouTube. "It was a clear loss on my part. From the beginning there was no moment I thought I was leading."

The latest victory by AlphaGo over South Korea's Lee puts Google's AlphaGo team one victory away from claiming the $1 million prize.

If AlphaGo wins, the prize money is to be donated to UNICEF, Go organizations and charities.

AlphaGo's first win against Lee, on Wednesday, shook the Go-playing world, marking a milestone in the development of .

Hundreds of thousands of South Koreans, even those who do not play the popular board game, followed the games on live TV and on YouTube. All major local newspapers reported Lee's loss on their front pages.

"2-year-old artificial intelligence masters 5,000-year-old human Go," said a headline in the Chosun Ilbo, South Korea's most circulated daily newspaper.

South Korean professional Go player Lee Sedol puts the first stone against Google's artificial intelligence program, AlphaGo during the second match of the Google DeepMind Challenge Match in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, March 10, 2016. Google's computer program AlphaGo defeated its human opponent, South Korean Go champion Lee Sedol, on Wednesday in the first face-off of a historic five-game match. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

Many had believed it would take another decade for computers to conquer the ancient Chinese board game, one of the most creative games ever devised and the only left to conquer after chess was mastered by computers in 1997. Go is much more complex than chess.

Google's team compared AlphaGo's win to landing on the moon.

The three remaining games run until Tuesday. Even if Lee loses the third game, he will play all five games.

Human Go champion 'speechless' after 2nd loss to machine
South Korean professional Go player Lee Sedol, right, appears on the screen during the second match of the Google DeepMind Challenge Match against Google's artificial intelligence program, AlphaGo at the media room in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, March 10, 2016. Google's computer program AlphaGo defeated its human opponent, South Korean Go champion Lee Sedol, on Wednesday in the first face-off of a historic five-game match. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

Lee, 33, brimmed with confidence two weeks ago but that confidence was missing after two straight defeats.

"The third game is not going to be easy for me," he said.

Human Go champion 'speechless' after 2nd loss to machine
South Korean professional Go player Lee Sedol, right, prepares for his second stone against Google's artificial intelligence program, AlphaGo, as Google DeepMind's lead programmer Aja Huang, left, sits during the second match of the Google DeepMind Challenge Match in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, March 10, 2016. Google's computer program AlphaGo defeated its human opponent, South Korean Go champion Lee Sedol, on Wednesday in the first face-off of a historic five-game match. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

Human Go champion 'speechless' after 2nd loss to machine
South Korean professional Go player Lee Sedol puts the first stone against Google's artificial intelligence program, AlphaGo during the second match of the Google DeepMind Challenge Match in Seoul, South Korea, Thursday, March 10, 2016. Google's computer program AlphaGo defeated its human opponent, South Korean Go champion Lee Sedol, on Wednesday in the first face-off of a historic five-game match. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

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ogg_ogg
not rated yet Mar 10, 2016
In the article I read Monday, prior to his first game, Lee sounded quite intimidated, in contrast to this article's claim that he was "brimming with confidence". Based just on the tone of his remarks (although whether they were translated adequately is another question since I don't speak/read Korean) I'm not surprized at his losses: psychology is a major factor at this level of play.

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