Aqua Satellite sees Tropical Cyclone 16P form in Gulf of Carpentaria

March 16, 2016 by Rob Gutro
On Mar. 16, 2016 NASA's Aqua satellite captured this visible image of Tropical Cyclone 16P in Australia's southern Gulf of Carpentaria. Queensland is the east (right). Credit: NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team

The sixteenth tropical cyclone of the Southern Pacific Ocean season was forming in the southern Gulf of Carpentaria on March 16 as NASA's Aqua satellite captured a visible picture of the storm. The storm is already headed for landfall in Queensland, Australia, and is not expected to strengthen.

Tropical Cyclone 16P (16P) came together on March 17 at 0300 UTC (March 16 at 11 p.m. EDT). It was centered just 60 nautical miles (60.9 miles/111.1 km) east-northeast of Mornington Island, Australia, near 16.3 degrees south latitude and 140.2 degrees east longitude. 16P had maximum sustained winds near 35 knots (40 mph/62 kph) and was moving to the east-southeast at 9 knots (10.3 mph/16.6 kph).

16P is expected to make landfall later today near the mouth of the Gilbert River in Queensland, located between Kowanyama to the north and Karumba to the south.

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology noted on March 16, "The Cyclone Warning between Karumba and Cape Keerweer has been cancelled. The low has moved rapidly eastwards during the day and is now close to the coast. It is no longer expected to intensify into a tropical cyclone. Heavy rainfall which may lead to flash flooding may still develop between Kowanyama and Karumba later today."

Explore further: NASA's RapidScat spots newborn Tropical Cyclone Tatiana

Related Stories

Tropical Cyclone 16P forms near Fiji

February 28, 2014

Tropical Cyclone 16P formed near Fiji after lingering in the region for several days as a tropical low pressure area. NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured an infrared image of the storm on February 28.

NASA sees Tropical Cyclone Winston form

February 11, 2016

After Tropical Cyclone Winston formed between Vanuatu and Fiji in the Southern Pacific Ocean NASA's Aqua satellite passed overhead and saw powerful thunderstorms had quickly developed.

Recommended for you

Heavy nitrogen molecules reveal planetary-scale tug-of-war

November 17, 2017

Nature whispers its stories in a faint molecular language, and Rice University scientist Laurence Yeung and colleagues can finally tell one of those stories this week, thanks to a one-of-a-kind instrument that allowed them ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.