Researchers find source of 1964 devastating Alaska tsunami

February 1, 2016 byDan Joling

Federal scientists say they've pinpointed the cause of tsunami waves that destroyed an Alaska village following the 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake, the second-largest ever recorded, at magnitude 9.2.

The U.S. Geological Survey says undersea landslides in water up to 1,150 feet deep triggered a that killed 23 people in the Prince William Sound village of Chenega (chen-EE'-gah).

That's far deeper than the underwater slides that sent deadly into the towns of Valdez (val-DEEZ), Seward and Whittier.

Undersea mapping shortly after the quake reached only about 330 , and the cause of the Chenega tsunami previously was a mystery. USGS researchers used multi-beam sonar and other tools to find evidence of deeper slide.

The deadly waves reached Chenega four minutes after the earthquake.

Explore further: Magnitude-6.2 earthquake hits off Alaska's Aleutian Islands

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