El Nino begins decline after 'powerful' impact: UN

Affected by El Nino, the Magdalena, Colombia's main river, is in its lowest level in 15 years
Affected by El Nino, the Magdalena, Colombia's main river, is in its lowest level in 15 years

The 2015-2016 El Nino weather phenomenon, one of the most powerful on record, has begun its decline but continues to have a strong influence on global climate patterns, the UN's weather agency said Thursday.

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) said El Nino, which occurs every two to seven years, has "passed its peak" but ocean temperature rises in recent months proved its considerable impact.

"We have just witnessed one of the most powerful ever El Nino events which caused extreme in countries on all continents and helped fuel record global heat in 2015," WMO Secretary General Petteri Taalas said in a statement.

The UN agency had forecast this El Nino to be the worst in 15 years, a prediction borne out by ocean temperatures recorded in late 2015 that were more than 2.0 degrees Celsius above average.

The WMO statement said this El Nino was comparable to the particularly strong phenomena recorded in 1982-83 and 1997-98.

"Parts of South America and East Africa are still recovering from and flooding," the statement said, linking those events to El Nino, which sparks global climate extremes.

"The economic and human toll from drought...is becoming increasingly apparent in southern (Africa) and the Horn of Africa, central America and a number of other regions," it added.

Workers move emergency food supplies at Ethiopia's largest "strategic grain reserve" depot in Adama, on February 13, 2
Workers move emergency food supplies at Ethiopia's largest "strategic grain reserve" depot in Adama, on February 13, 2016

This El Nino is expected to end towards the middle of the year.

While scientists say weather patterns like El Nino are not caused by climate change, rising caused by global warming are believed to impact their intensity and frequency.


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© 2016 AFP

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Feb 19, 2016
The fact is astronomical variations were pushing the planet into a slow temperature decline along with CO2 over 12k-16k years to where CO2 finally drops below 200-ppm to bounce along until a full glacial can happen at around 180-ppm.

The match to our astronomical conditions is from 700k-years ago, not the Eemian in Greenland ice (also Sangamonian, Ipswichian, Mikulin, Kaydaky, Valdivia, Riss-Würm).

The Eemian put 3-5m more sea-level than today, what's your guess on ours that is a weaker cooling that the Eemian?

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